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Program at a glance

Consulta il Programma Scientifico di ICAR 2024 nella versione at...

 
Auditorium
Aula Lazzati
Aula Bausola
Aula 5
Aula 6
Aula 7
Aula Germania
14.00
14.30
15.00
15.30
16.00
16.30
17.00
17.30
18.00
18.30
19.00
19.30
20.00
20.30
21.00
21.30
22.00
22.30
23.00
18.00 - 19.00
Symposium
How to meet patient needs in PWH?
19.00 - 20.45
ICAR 2024 Opening Session
20.45 - 22.30
ICAR 2024 Welcome Reception
15.00 - 17.30
Pre-Conference advanced course
Ageing in people with HIV: a feasible challenge
15.00 - 17.30
Pre-Conference advanced course
Immune response in viral infections: where we are with new knowledge
15.00 - 17.30
Special Session
RaccontART Contest Awards: incontro con le scuole finaliste e premiazione
15.00 - 17.30
Pre-Conference advanced course
Complexities of HIV management: when the going gets tough... the tough get going!
15.00 - 17.30
Pre-Conference advanced course
Addressing viral persistence today and tomorrow
14.00 - 15.00
Parallel Session
Investigator Meeting Studio Woddol
  • Auditorium
    18.00 - 19.00
    Symposium
    How to meet patient needs in PWH?
    Symposium
    With an unrestricted educational grant from: Gilead Sciences
    How to meet patient needs in PWH?
    The current HIV care paradigm goes beyond the concept of suppression of plasma HIV-RNA viral load and recovery of CD4+T cells by also taking into consideration all those factors, pharmacological and non pharmacological, general or tailored to the individual, that make long-term success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) possible. In this context, a person-centered approach must meet the needs and expectations of people with HIV (PWH) in order to ensure their long-term therapeutic success. The symposium aims to provide new knowledge about HIV and hepatitis viruses, especially in the most difficult-to-treat populations, such as PWH with suboptimal adherence and PWH with HBV/HDV coinfection. Through an interactive talk, experts will discuss current and future challenges and innovative strategies that can address the unmet needs of PWH, including whose with HBV/HDV coinfection, by supporting individuals to overcome clinical issues and improve outcomes and quality of life.
    Chairs: G.C. Marchetti, C. Mussini
    18.00 - 18.15
    Optimizing antiretroviral treatment in PWH with a person-centered approach
    A. Antinori
    18.15 - 18.30
    The importance of forgiveness for the sustained HIV virologic suppression
    F. Maggiolo
    18.30 - 18.45
    Improving outcomes of HBV/HDV infection among PWH
    M. Puoti
    18.45 - 19.00
    Discussion
    Andrea Antinori, Roma
    Franco Maggiolo, Fabro TR
    Giulia Carla Marchetti, Milano
    Cristina Mussini, Modena
    Massimo Puoti, Milano
    19.00 - 20.45
    ICAR 2024 Opening Session
    ICAR 2024 Opening Session
    Chairs: A. Cingolani, A. Di Biagio, M. Farinella, G.C. Marchetti
    19.00 - 19.15
    Introducing ICAR 2024: Chairs' welcome addresses
    19.15 - 19.20
    SIMIT President welcome addresses
    R. Parrella
    19.20 - 19.40
    Authorities' welcome addresses
    R. Bellantone, A. Gasbarrini
    19.40 - 19.50
    RaccontART: the three Winners
    A. Lazzarin
    19.50 - 20.30
    Keynote Lectures: The Year of PrEP
     
    Chair: A. Antinori
    19.50 - 20.10
    Mauro Moroni Memorial Lecture: ending HIV through PrEP: the impact of PrEP on the trajectories of new infections
    S. McCormack
    Two European PrEP trials confirmed the high biological efficacy of PrEP in 2015, boosting prevention efforts. The French government responded quickly and implemented a national programme through hospital clinics. The UK government stalled, but the sexual health clinic network supported those able to access PrEP through personal purchase of drug online at affordable prices. The Community raised awareness and charities supported those unable to purchase drug themselves. The impact on new infections was clear at clinic level, and now in national surveillance data. Even in the context of 95:95:95 for diagnosed: on treatment: undetectable, PrEP has an impact. However, there is room for improvement as we're still not diagnosing HIV quickly enough, and shifting social norms would really help in this space, particularly with respect to migrant populations.
     
    Chair: S. Mattioli
    20.10 - 20.30
    Giulio Maria Corbelli Memorial Lecture: The era of PrEP: time to end the AIDS crisis?
    D. Calzavara
    PrEP represents one of the greatest opportunities among the strategies we currently have to prevent HIV infection. The social and anthropological impacts of PrEP have generated an enhanced understanding of people's sexualities. These are experience with more self-determination and empowerment, creating opportunities for educational interventions, both in personal and collective perspectives. However, this extraordinary tool could be much more powerful. At the moment the application and distribution of PrEP patchy and unevenly distributed within the national prevention system. The result is that its revolutionary power is still underutilized and largely inaccessible.
    20.30 - 20.45
    Closing remarks
    Antonella Cingolani, Roma
    Antonio Di Biagio, Genova
    Massimo Farinella, Roma
    Giulia Carla Marchetti, Milano
    20.45 - 22.30
    ICAR 2024 Welcome Reception
    ICAR 2024 Welcome Reception
  • Aula Lazzati
    15.00 - 17.30
    Pre-Conference advanced course
    Ageing in people with HIV: a feasible challenge
    Pre-Conference advanced course
    Ageing in people with HIV: a feasible challenge
    Ageing is a physiologic process consisting of physical and mental changes. It is primarily influenced by a genetic factors but also by various external factors including diet, exercise, stress, and smoking. HIV infection has been associated with early ageing. Frailty is a clinically state increased vulnerability, resulting from age-associated declines in physiologic reserve and function across multiple organ systems, such that the ability to cope with everyday or acute stressors is compromised. Frailty is strictly associated with ageing and quality of life. Peoples living with HIV (PWH) are at increased risk of myocardial infarction: a recent trial has confirmed a beneficial impact of statin therapy also in PWH older than 40 yo with a low cardiovascular risk. Other comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension and depression contribute to polypharmacy in PWH. The aim of the course is to analyze the principle issues regarding Ageing in PWH and how to manage them focusing on practical recommendations.
    Chairs: G. Giupponi, F. Leserri, N. Squillace
    15.00 - 15.30
    Results of a Survey about Quality of Life in persons with HIV
    N. Policek
    15.30 - 16.00
    What is frailty and how can we prevent and manage it?
    J. Milic
    16.00 - 16.10
    Discussion
    16.10 - 16.40
    Less is more: how can we manage polypharmacy in persons with HIV?
    M. Ferrara
    16.40 - 17.10
    If I feel sad, what should I do? Depression burden in persons with HIV
    M.G. Strepparava
    17.10 - 17.30
    Discussion
  • Aula Bausola
    15.00 - 17.30
    Pre-Conference advanced course
    Immune response in viral infections: where we are with new knowledge
    Pre-Conference advanced course
    Immune response in viral infections: where we are with new knowledge
    In the host, innate and adaptive immunity are the arms of a functional and well-organized immune response against several pathogens. Beside immune system, inflammation protects the host by eliminating pathogens, repairing damaged tissue, and restoring homeostasis. Inflammasome is the core component of the inflammatory response, having a crucial role in resisting pathogenic infections and maintaining immune homeostasis by releasing inflammatory soluble factors. An overactive inflammasome can also trigger a cytokine storm, leading to various inflammatory diseases and exacerbating tissue damage. During viral infections, a balanced immune/inflammatory response is prominent in resolving the infection. Innate immunity implements non cellular/cellular strategies to eliminate viruses in the early stage of infection, by priming specific T and B cells responses in the resolving phase. Viruses are able to modify host's immune response both in acute/chronic phases of infection, by evolving mechanisms to evade or to yperactivate immune response by damaging the host. T cells have a pivotal role in controlling infectious diseases and cancer. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cells (CAR-T) therapy has emerged as a highly efficacious treatment modality for refractory and relapsed hematopoietic malignancies in recent years. Thus, it seems likely that engineered, re-directed T cells will also be able to control these diseases when naturally occurring T cells fail. A successful effector CAR-T cell therapy is designed to kill every cancer or virus-infected cell in the patient. By understanding the biology of naturally occurring T cells, these advances will help the field to engineer better T cells to function in a wide array of disease areas. In this pre-congress course we will deepen the innovative diagnostic and therapeutic aspects in the control of acute and chronic viral infections in view of the clinical and pathogenetic relevance of the host's immune response during viral infections.
    Chairs: E. Cimini, S. Piconi
    15.00 - 15.30
    Innate immunity and inflammation
    R. Rovito
    15.30 - 16.00
    Adaptive immune response in viral infections: T and B lymphocytes
    S. De Biasi
    16.00 - 16.30
    Monoclonal antibodies in viral infections
    E. Andreano
    16.30 - 17.00
    Novel T-cell therapies in viral infections
    V. Bordoni
    17.00 - 17.30
    Discussion
  • Aula 5
    15.00 - 17.30
    Special Session
    RaccontART Contest Awards: incontro con le scuole finaliste e premiazione
    Special Session
    RaccontART Contest Awards: incontro con le scuole finaliste e premiazione
    Giunto alla decima edizione e destinato agli studenti degli Istituti Scolastici Superiori, il Contest artistico RaccontART rappresenta un'occasione unica e preziosa di formazione e informazione in tema di HIV, Infezioni Sessualmente Trasmesse e Covid-19. Questa sessione è dedicata alla presentazione delle Opere finaliste in concorso, selezionate dalle Giurie Artistica e Tecnico-Scientifica. Al termine della Sessione, verranno premiati i primi tre classificati.
    Chairs: A. Caraglia, F. Ceccherini Silberstein, M. Errico
    15.00 - 15.30
    Benvenuto dei Presidenti ICAR 2024
    Antonella Cingolani, Roma
    Antonio Di Biagio, Genova
    Massimo Farinella, Roma
    Giulia Carla Marchetti, Milano
    15.30 - 15.40
    Introduzione e presentazione della Giuria Artistica e Tecnico-Scientifica
    Anna Caraglia, Roma
    Francesca Ceccherini Silberstein, Roma
    Margherita Errico, Milano
    15.40 - 17.00
    Presentazione delle Opere finaliste al Concorso a cura degli Istituti Scolastici
    17.00 - 17.15
    Premiazione primi 3 classificati
    A. Lazzarin
    17.15 - 17.30
    Conclusioni
  • Aula 6
    15.00 - 17.30
    Pre-Conference advanced course
    Complexities of HIV management: when the going gets tough... the tough get going!
    Pre-Conference advanced course
    Complexities of HIV management: when the going gets tough... the tough get going!
    The aim of this pre-congressional course is to reflect on some topics in the management of HIV infection of high clinical complexity. The simultaneous presence of multiple comorbidities can create extreme difficulties for clinicians in the daily clinical management of the person living with HIV. The course is aimed at young infectivologists who will be able to interactively discuss with tutors the approach of five different HIV-related issues. The course aims to critically analyse diagnostic and therapeutic choices in order to synthesise practical management principles useful in clinical practice.
    Chairs: T. Bini, C. Pinnetti
    15.00 - 15.20
    Saturday Naive Fever: when two (or more) infections are better than one
    A. Mondi
    Background:
    This case study analyses the simultaneous presence of multiple opportunistic infections during a recent HIV diagnosis. This case report will allow a discussion of the main diagnostic tests, differential diagnosis and timing of initiation of the different therapies.
    15.20 - 15.30
    Discussion
    15.30 - 15.50
    Atypical mycobacteriosis yes or not: that is the question
    A. Giacomelli
    Background:
    This case report is about a male patient who has been diagnosed with late HIV infection, visceral KS and IRIS-atypical mycobacteriosis. The patient presented with fever and lymphoadenopathy after cART introduction; an initial worsening of symptoms with abdominal pain needed a surgical operation and several modifications of antimycobacterial therapy. The clinical presentation of IRIS and mycobacteriosis, as well as the difficulties in the diagnosis and in the choice of the correct antimycobacterial treatment, are discussed.
    15.50 - 16.00
    Discussion
    16.00 - 16.20
    End-stage liver disease in HIV: when and how to get ready for transplant?
    M. Merli
    Background:
    Liver transplant in PWH increased significantly in the last 20 years, thanks to the improvements in antiretroviral treatment and prolonged survival. The coinfection with HDV, the alcohol-related liver disease and the increasing prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are the current major determinants of end-stage liver disease. HBV/HDV coinfection may have a more aggressive and often unpredictable course in PWH, making liver transplantation the only curative strategy, with success rates related to both transplant timing and patients overall condition (both clinical and social) at the time of transplantation. This clinical case is about a HBV/HDV coinfected PWH who underwent liver transplant and describes the complications that an ID physician has to manage when caring a PWH undergoing liver transplant.
    16.20 - 16.30
    Discussion
    16.30 - 16.50
    Empathetic Care in Action: Navigating the Complex Journey of Transgender Individuals Living with HIV
    G. Lapadula
    Background:
    The analysis of this clinical case aims to review the clinical management of a transgender PWH. The main screening tests for infectious and oncological pathologies, the choice of antiretroviral therapy and the social issues of retention in care will be discussed.
    16.50 - 17.00
    Discussion
    17.00 - 17.20
    What ulcer can I do for you?
    N. Girometti
    Background:
    This clinical case is about a male patient that presented at HIV/GUM outpatient clinic for genital warts; the physical examination instead showed several genital ulcerations and unilateral vision loss. The patient has been diagnosed with syphilis some years before, but he hadn't be advised to start PrEP. HIV rapid test was positive and later malignant syphilis with optic neuritis was diagnosed. Differential diagnoses of genital ulcers are illustrated and the need of STI testing and PrEP in preventing HIV infection is discussed.
    17.20 - 17.30
    Discussion
  • Aula 7
    15.00 - 17.30
    Pre-Conference advanced course
    Addressing viral persistence today and tomorrow
    Pre-Conference advanced course
    Addressing viral persistence today and tomorrow
    The last decade has seen a profound change in our understanding of viral persistence as a much more dynamic picture of the reservoir emerged. The mechanisms that prevent HIV and HBV eradication have been redefined, as well as their role in chronic immune activation and inflammation. At the same time, the COVID-19 global pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 reopens questions about the ability of some RNA viruses to drive chronic symptoms by persisting in certain body sites or tissue reservoirs after acute infection. In summary, viral persistence is undoubtedly complex and multifaceted process, but if approached from the right angle, can yield many clues for the identification of new weapons and new curative strategies to counteract it. Thus, this course is shedding light on the state of the art as well as the most recent discoveries and fascinating innovations in HIV, HBV, HDV persistence and post-COVID-19 syndrome. It uncovers putative links between viral persistence, viral evolution, host immune status, and protective immunity to guide and direct future basic science and clinical research priorities.
    Chairs: C. Alteri, C. Scagnolari
     
    HIV-1: markers for persistence, latency and resistance
    15.00 - 15.20
    The virological point of view
    O. Turriziani
    15.20 - 15.40
    The clinical point of view
    M. Iannetta
    15.40 - 15.50
    Discussion
     
    HBV/HDV: from virology to pathophysiology
    15.50 - 16.10
    The virological point of view
    R. Salpini
    16.10 - 16.30
    The clinical point of view
    E. Degasperi
    16.30 - 16.40
    Discussion
     
    SARS-CoV-2: evolution and monitoring
    16.40 - 17.00
    The virological point of view
    A. Pierangeli
    17.00 - 17.20
    The clinical point of view
    A. Lombardi
    17.20 - 17.30
    Discussion
  • Aula Germania
    14.00 - 15.00
    Parallel Session
    Investigator Meeting Studio Woddol
    Parallel Session
    Investigator Meeting Studio Woddol
    Chairs: A. Cingolani, F. Lombardi
 
Plenary-Aula Lazzati
Aula Bausola
Aula 5
Aula 6
Aula 7
Aula Germania
09.00
09.30
10.00
10.30
11.00
11.30
12.00
12.30
13.00
13.30
14.00
14.30
15.00
15.30
16.00
16.30
17.00
17.30
18.00
18.30
19.00
19.30
20.00
09.00 - 10.00
Keynote Lectures
Bridging to the future with long-acting therapies
C. Mussini
Harnessing the microbiome in HIV vaccine responses
R. Paredes
10.05 - 11.05
Symposium
The role of non-biomedical primary prevention in the end HIV strategies
11.10 - 12.10
Symposium
Are three-drug ARV regimens still needed for long-term treatment success?
12.15 - 13.15
Symposium
Three elephants in the room: clinical approach to the most relevant comorbidities related to HIV infection
14.20 - 15.20
Symposium and Oral Communications
Real-world experiences with TAF-based regimens and Oral Communicartions
15.25 - 16.25
Symposium
Clinical HIV: looking ahead
16.30 - 17.30
Symposium
The future of STI prevention and care: one size does not fit all
17.35 - 18.30
Special Session
ICAR-CROI Awards 2024
10.05 - 11.05
Symposium
Back to the future of COVID-19: virus evolution, host susceptibility and clinical peculiarities
11.10 - 12.10
Symposium
Infectious disease management in patients living with onco-hematological malignances: focus on COVID-19 and invasive fungal infections (IFI)
12.15 - 13.15
Expert Meeting
COVID-19 risk assessment and prophylaxis in fragile population
13.15 - 14.15
Short Communications
Sexual health and love's labours
14.20 - 15.20
Symposium
Antiviral treatment of COVID-19 for fragile people in the current era
15.25 - 17.30
Symposium and Oral Communications
COVID-19 and post-Covid conditions in 2024: data from the EuCARE project
10.05 - 11.05
Expert Meeting
Winning cardiometabolic comorbidities in HIV: the best place for doravirine
11.10 - 12.10
Oral Communications
HIV epidemiology and testing promotion
12.15 - 13.15
Expert Meeting
PrEP and more
13.15 - 14.15
Short Communications
PrEParing for the future of prevention
14.20 - 15.20
Oral Communications
Virology and pharmacology across the spectrum of HIV treatment
15.25 - 16.25
Expert Meeting
Tailoring of antiretroviral therapy in PWH who go through therapeutic failure. Experts panel discussion on real clinical scenarios
16.30 - 17.30
Oral Communications
The complexities of HIV infection
11.10 - 12.10
Oral Communications
Immune responses to vaccination and emerging infections
12.15 - 13.15
Oral Communications
Long Acting injectables: the Italian experience
13.15 - 14.15
Themed Discussions
Antiretroviral therapy: thinking of durability
14.20 - 15.20
Expert Meeting
Optimizing the management of patients with skin and soft tissue infections (ABSSSI): focus on fragile population
15.25 - 16.25
Oral Communications
Modern challenges in sexual health
16.30 - 17.30
Oral Communications
Immunological features in people living with HIV
18.30 - 19.30
Parallel Session
Screening HIV all'interno del Pronto Soccorso (un progetto congiunto SIMIT-SIMEU)
10.05 - 11.05
Themed Discussions
People living with HIV: thinking of QoL
12.15 - 13.15
Short Communications
Novel insights in the management of chronic viral hepatitis
13.15 - 14.15
Short Communications
HIV associated comorbidities: interplaying matters
15.25 - 16.25
Short Communications
Factors affecting treatment success: from pharmacology to drug resistance
16.30 - 17.30
Short Communications
COVID-19 Unmasked: role of immunity and early treatment
18.30 - 19.30
Parallel Session
Meeting Prestigio
15.25 - 17.25
Special Session
Approaching Chemsex user: a multidisciplinary practice
18.30 - 19.30
Parallel Session
Sierocoinvoltə
  • Plenary-Aula Lazzati
    09.00 - 10.00
    Sierocoinvolt
     
    Chairs: A. d'Arminio Monforte, C. Torti
    09.00 - 09.30
    Bridging to the future with long-acting therapies
    C. Mussini
    Recently, the field of anti-HIV therapy has been further revolutionized by the introduction of long-acting ART. The combination of CAB and RPV represents the first approved injectable long-acting ART for PWH. This combination has demonstrated high efficacy and safety in both registration and real-life studies. Despite the well-known advantages of the CAB/RPV injectable regimen, such as convenience, privacy, stigma reduction, and improved medication management, there are still some barriers to its widespread use. The lecture will provide a summary and update on currently available long-acting antiretrovirals, as well as those in development, and will discuss the challenges involved in their effective implementation.
    09.30 - 10.00
    Harnessing the microbiome in HIV vaccine responses
    R. Paredes
    In the setting of HIV infection, specific microbiome signatures have been linked, on the one hand, to disease progression and on the other, to immune-mediated viral control. Given its key role in shaping the host's adaptive immune response and in modulating the inflammation, the microbiome may be exploited to provide new opportunities to pursue an HIV cure.
    10.05 - 11.05
    Symposium
    The role of non-biomedical primary prevention in the end HIV strategies
    Symposium
    The role of non-biomedical primary prevention in the end HIV strategies
    Information, education and interventions to promote behavior changes have been the cornerstone of HIV prevention for more than two decades. Since 2010 UNAIDS program has called for the inclusion of antiretroviral treatment as a key pillar in the global strategy to control the spread of HIV infection, thus supporting the concept of treatment as prevention. More recently, oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been demonstrated to be highly efficacious and often effective in public health. In this context non-biomedical interventions for primary prevention, are often seen as having a marginal role in the context of HIV elimination program, although it seem unlikely that biomedical interventions alone will eventually lead to ending the HIV epidemic. In this round table we will discuss the evidence base and the potential impact of several aspects of non-biomedical primary prevention including comprehensive sexuality education, communication for young people through social media and interventions for vulnerable population such as migrants.
    Chairs: M. Farinella, E. Girardi
     
    Round table
    10.05 - 10.15
    Sexuality education: the EduforIST project
    L. Tavoschi
    10.15 - 10.25
    Social effectiveness and communication among young people
    A. Camposeragna
    10.25 - 10.35
    Migrant populations
    A. Saracino
    10.35 - 10.45
    Transgender populations
    S. Mehiel, A. Monopoli
    10.45 - 11.05
    Discussion
    11.10 - 12.10
    Symposium
    Are three-drug ARV regimens still needed for long-term treatment success?
    Symposium
    Sponsored by: ViiV Healthcare
    Are three-drug ARV regimens still needed for long-term treatment success?
    In recent decades, the needs of people living with HIV have evolved as life expectancy has greatly increased. Current ARV regimens are required to meet the ambitious goal of long-term treatment success: to do so, they must guarantee high genetic barrier to resistance, long-term efficacy, optimal long-term safety and tolerability, simplicity and ensure good quality of life. Over the last years, we have witnessed the latest evolution of ART, with the development of two drug regimens capable of ensuring high rates of treatment success, at similar levels to three drug regimens, but with less ARV agents. The aim of this round table is to critically discuss the role of DTG/3TC as a two-drug regimen capable of ensuring long term treatment success.
    Chairs: R. Gulminetti, C. Mussini
    Moderators: R. Gulminetti, C. Mussini
    Discussants: G. d'Ettorre, S. Di Giambenedetto, D. Ripamonti, A. Vergori
    11.10 - 11.15
    Opening and introduction
    R. Gulminetti, C. Mussini
     
    Round table
    11.15 - 11.25
    Potency and barrier to resistance of DTG/3TC
    D. Ripamonti
    11.25 - 11.35
    Sustained virologic efficacy over time with DTG/3TC
    S. Di Giambenedetto
    11.35 - 11.45
    Long term tolerability of DTG/3TC
    G. d'Ettorre
    11.45 - 11.55
    Quality of life and people satisfaction with DTG/3TC
    A. Vergori
    11.55 - 12.10
    Discussion and take-home messages
    Moderators:
    Roberto Gulminetti, Pavia
    Cristina Mussini, Modena

    Discussants:
    Gabriella d'Ettorre, Roma
    Simona Di Giambenedetto, Roma
    Diego Ripamonti, Bergamo
    Alessandra Vergori, Roma
    12.15 - 13.15
    Symposium
    Three elephants in the room: clinical approach to the most relevant comorbidities related to HIV infection
    Symposium
    Three elephants in the room: clinical approach to the most relevant comorbidities related to HIV infection
    Although highly effective and well-tolerated therapies are now available, people with HIV continue to be at increased risk of developing certain comorbidities. In particular cardiovascular diseases, cancers and mental health conditions. The aim of the symposium will be to explore the latest evidence that attempts to explain the underlying causes of this phenomenon.
    Chairs: P.M. Cinque, N. Frattini
    12.15 - 12.30
    Lipids or inflammation: which is the main driver of cardiovascular events in person with HIV?
    G.V.L. De Socio
    12.30 - 12.35
    Discussion
    12.35 - 12.50
    Mental health at the intersection of social and medical factors
    A. Winston O' Keefe
    12.50 - 12.55
    Discussion
    12.55 - 13.10
    Did we really break down the walls? Lymphoproliferative disorders in person with HIV today
    L. Verga
    13.10 - 13.15
    Discussion
    14.20 - 15.20
    Symposium and Oral Communications
    Real-world experiences with TAF-based regimens and Oral Communicartions
    Symposium and Oral Communications
    With an unrestricted educational grant from: Gilead Sciences
    Real-world experiences with TAF-based regimens and Oral Communicartions
    TAF stands as a pivotal advancement in the management of HIV. Its introduction marks a significant milestone for achieving long-term treatment success in PWH. The symposium aims to present and discuss RWE of TAF-based regimens in HIV management across diverse patient populations and healthcare settings. By informing evidence-based decision-making, the symposium seeks to optimize patient care, leading to improved treatment strategies and outcomes for PWH.
    Chair: S. Di Giambenedetto
    Discussants: R. Gagliardini, A. Giacomelli
    14.20 - 14.30
    PWH: present and future clinical scenario
    S. Di Giambenedetto
     
    Clinical experiences in real-life settings
    14.30 - 14.40
    OC 13
    Efficacy of switching to bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide in people living with HIV with pre-existing NRTI resistances: a real-life experience
    L. Mezzogori1, B. Bruzzone2, F. Stefanelli2, M. Zazzi3, L. Taramasso1, R. Schiavoni1, C. Bartalucci1, L. Labate1, N. Randazzo2, F. Maggiolo4, M. Bassetti1,5, A. Di Biagio1,5
    1Department of Specialist Medicine, Infectious Disease Clinic, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy, 2Hygiene Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino for Oncology and Neurosciences, Genoa, Italy, 3Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 4Independent Contractor, Italy, 5Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
    14.40 - 14.50
    OC 14
    Adherence of single tablet antiretroviral regimens in the clinical setting: forgiveness does matter
    V. Maccario, M. Ferrara, M. Maunero, G. Trevisan, G. Accardo, F. Barrera, E. Clemente, M. Tettoni, L. Trentini, G. Di Perri, A. Calcagno, S. Bonora
    Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy
    14.50 - 15.00
    OC 15
    Changes in Body mass index and lipid profile in PWH switching to a regimen without TAF vs PWH continuing TAF. Data from a real-life setting
    N. Squillace1, L. Taramasso2, E. Ricci3, B. Menzaghi4, G. De Socio5, G. Orofino6, B.M. Celesia7, E. Sarchi8, S. Piconi9, G. Pellicano’10, L. Attala11, A. Di Biagio2, P. Bonfanti1, for the CISAI Study Group
    1Infectious Diseases Unit Fondazione IRCCS, San Gerardo dei Tintori-University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases, San Martino Hospital Genoa, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 3Fondazione ASIA Onlus, Buccinasco, Milano, Italy, 4Unit of Infectious Diseases, ASST della Valle Olona – Busto Arsizio, Varese, Italy, 5Unit of Infectious Diseases, Santa Maria Hospital, Perugia, Italy, 6Division I of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, ASL Città di Torino, Italy, 7Unit of Infectious Diseases, Garibaldi Hospital, Catania, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, S. Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo Hospital, Alessandria, Italy, 9Unit of Infectious Diseases, A. Manzoni Hospital, Lecco, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases, G. Martino Hospital -University of Messina, Messina, Italy, 11Unit of Infectious Diseases, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Florence, Italy
    15.00 - 15.20
    Discussions and final considerations
    Simona Di Giambenedetto, Roma
    Roberta Gagliardini, Roma
    Andrea Giacomelli, Milano
    15.25 - 16.25
    Symposium
    Clinical HIV: looking ahead
    Symposium
    Clinical HIV: looking ahead
    The current clinical landscape of HIV encompasses several noteworthy areas of interest. These include managing opportunistic infections, which continue to occur due to a significant number of individuals experiencing AIDS-defining illnesses as well as addressing new challenges related to expanding access to transplantation for selected HIV patients. Despite advances in antiretroviral therapy, surgical techniques, and post-operative care, concerns remain regarding organ rejection, opportunistic infections, and drug interactions. The symposium will focus on gaining new insights into opportunistic infections like tuberculosis and cryptococcosis, and making advances in organ transplantation for person living with HIV. Careful patient selection, close monitoring, and tailored immunosuppressive therapy will be given particular attention.
    Chairs: C. Gervasoni, S. Lo Caputo
    15.25 - 15.40
    What is still to be done in solid organ transplantation for person living with HIV
    G. Guaraldi
    15.40 - 15.45
    Discussion
    15.45 - 16.00
    Can person living with HIV benefit from short strategies for preventing and treating tuberculosis?
    G. Di Perri
    16.00 - 16.05
    Discussion
    16.05 - 16.20
    Can person living with HIV benefit from short therapy in cryptococcal meningitis?
    S. Antinori
    16.20 - 16.25
    Discussion
    16.30 - 17.30
    Symposium
    The future of STI prevention and care: one size does not fit all
    Symposium
    The future of STI prevention and care: one size does not fit all
    Join our symposium on STI prevention and care. Against a backdrop of evolving landscapes in healthcare and policy, we will probe into emerging aspects of STI surveillance, placing Italy within the European context. Hosted by the Journal Sexually Transmitted Infections, a discourse on standards will navigate the complexities of delivering equity of care to varied demographics. We will challenge conventional wisdom by debating the necessity of routine STI screening in asymptomatic individuals using PrEP, an area of contention with significant implications for resource allocation, patient management and antibiotic stewardship. Expert opinions will illuminate diverse perspectives and audience participation will enrich the discourse.
    Chairs: A.M. Geretti, S. Mattioli
    Moderators: A.M. Geretti, S. Mattioli
    16.30 - 16.45
    STI surveillance in Italy: what's hidden under the carpet?
    B. Suligoi
    16.45 - 17.00
    Standards of STI care: what good will look like "Hosted by STI, a BMJ journal"
    V. Padovese
     
    Debate: do we need to reduce STI screening in asymptomatic PrEP users?
    17.00 - 17.07
    The argument against
    S. Nozza
    17.07 - 17.14
    The argument for
    N. Girometti
    17.14 - 17.30
    Q&A and take away points
    Moderators:
    Anna Maria Geretti, Roma
    Sandro Mattioli, Bologna
    17.35 - 18.30
    Special Session
    ICAR-CROI Awards 2024
    Special Session
    ICAR-CROI Awards 2024
    This session is devoted to Young Italian Researchers - under 40 - who had an abstract accepted at CROI 2024. The following prizes will be announced and awarded: two prizes for the best Clinical and Basic Science abstracts.
    Chairs: R. Cauda, M. Galli, A. Lazzarin
    17.35 - 17.45
    Introduction
    R. Cauda
    17.45 - 18.00
    The Italian Young Investigators who had an abstract accepted at CROI 2024
    M. Galli, A. Lazzarin
     

    · Immune responses to an original/BA.4-5 Bivalent Booster of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine in PWH on ART
    M. Augello
     

    · A matter of time: factors associated with delayed nPEP initiation
    N.B. Bana
     

    · Evaluation of the performance of different high resolution Anoscopy triage strategies in MSM LWH
    E.N. Cavallari
     

    · Prevalence and resistance profiles of unusual HCV subtypes in Italy
    C.A. Chenwi
     

    · Intrahepatic HDV activity is fueled by integrated HBV DNA-derived HBs independently from CccDNA size
    S. D'Anna
     

    · MPXV replication induces an IFN response and is suppressed by IFN-γ
    A. D'Auria
     

    · SARS-CoV-2 infection and hospitalization in immunocompromised children: a population-based study
    C. Di Chiara
     

    · Real-life experience on the use of Remdesivir: a propensity score matched analysis
    F. Di Gennaro
     

    · Antiretrovirals drug concentrations in post-mortem tissues for different body compartments: preliminary results from the Last Gift project
    M. Ferrara
     

    · Synergistic effects of HIV, HPV, and Polyomaviruses on interferon response in male anal mucosa
    M. Fracella
     

    · SARS-CoV-2 natural infection elicits cross-reactive immunity to OC43
    M. Garziano
     

    · Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction in patients with syphilis with or without prior antibiotic prophylaxis
    S. Lazzarin
     

    · Outcome of a multidimensional intervention for insomnia in a Cohort of people living with HIV
    M. Mazzitelli
     

    · Predictors of Mpox duration and severity in the Italian multicenter mpox ICONA Cohort
    · Pooled analysis of randomized trials comparing drug efficacy for early COVID-19 during omicron waves
    · Predictors of failure to COVID-19 early therapies and drugs efficacy comparison by emulation trial
    V. Mazzotta
     

    · Transaminase elevations among patients with occult HBV infection on two-drug antiretroviral regimens
    L. Mezzadri
     

    · Plausibility of sexual behavior changes and role of vaccination in Mpox outbreak control among MSM
    D. Moschese
     

    · Lymphogranuloma venereum among men who have sex with men: 7 versus 21 days Doxycycline effectiveness
    A.R. Raccagni
     

    · Lipidome composition and weight changes at 48week 3TC-DTG and FTC/TAF/BIC: data of the ICONA Cohort
    R. Rovito
     

    · A model to eliminate viral Hepatitis infection in migrants: a prospective Study in Southern Italy
    A. Russo
     

    · Seroprevalence of Mpox IgG antibodies in a Cohort of PLWH in Rome, during the 2022 outbreak
    P.F. Salvo
     

    · ERAPs control in vitro and ex-vivo SARS-CoV-2 infection by triggering antiviral immune response
    I. Saulle
     

    · High plasma GFAP in older PWH with low Nadir CD4 supports legacy brain injury and reactive gliosis
    M. Strano
     

    · Exacerbation of the RSV infectivity by SARS-CoV-2 in an in-vitro Co-Infection cellular model
    C. Vanetti
    18.00 - 18.30
    ICAR-CROI Awards for the best Clinical and Basic science abstract 2024
    Roberto Cauda, Roma
    Massimo Galli, Milano
    Adriano Lazzarin,Milano
  • Aula Bausola
    10.05 - 11.05
    Symposium
    Back to the future of COVID-19: virus evolution, host susceptibility and clinical peculiarities
    Symposium
    Back to the future of COVID-19: virus evolution, host susceptibility and clinical peculiarities
    The SARS-CoV-2 epidemic has been changing over time, and COVID-19 is transforming from a pandemic to an endemic disease. A great number of genotypic sequences have demonstrated the evolutionary distance of SARS-CoV-2 from 2019 to date. A deep insight into the mechanisms of viral evolution, from the natural selection of advantageous variants to the emergence of drug resistance, will be useful to understand changes in transmissibility, disease severity and immune escape. To date, COVID-19 burden has disproportionally affected the immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, the knowledge of immunogenicity elicited by natural infection and vaccines among them might be relevant for effective management, in terms of booster vaccination, pre-exposure prophylaxis, early access to treatment, and appropriate inpatients care. Post Acute Sequalae of COVID-19 (PASC) represent a mental health challenge, with neuropsychiatric problems that display a novel model of post-viral brain involvement. COVID-19 is associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can induce various biological dysregulations, including brain tissue injury. Neuroinflammation may additionally accelerate the progression of various neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric complications. The goal of the last section of the meeting is to update and discuss mechanisms of long-term mental health issues in people with PASC.
    Chairs: G. Madeddu, A. Vergori
    10.05 - 10.20
    Key drivers of SARS-CoV-2 evolutionary direction: from natural selection to drug-resistance
    M. Zazzi
    10.20 - 10.25
    Discussion
    10.25 - 10.40
    COVID-19 tie break: a hard shift for immunocompromised patients
    C. Agrati
    10.40 - 10.45
    Discussion
    10.45 - 11.00
    Pathways and markers of virus and immune-related CNS injury in long-COVID
    S. Beretta
    11.00 - 11.05
    Discussion
    11.10 - 12.10
    Symposium
    Infectious disease management in patients living with onco-hematological malignances: focus on COVID-19 and invasive fungal infections (IFI)
    Symposium
    With an unrestricted educational grant from: Gilead Sciences
    Infectious disease management in patients living with onco-hematological malignances: focus on COVID-19 and invasive fungal infections (IFI)
    The session aims to reflect on the urgency of improving the management of fungal infections and Covid-19 in hematology patients who face unique challenges related to compromised immune system resulting from chemotherapy treatments, malignant hemopathy, and HSCT. In this context, the onset of invasive fungal infections represents a significant threat, bringing with it the risk of serious complications and even mortality in an already vulnerable population. The global emergency of Covid-19 has further complicated the situation for hematology patients, making it crucial to deep into the relationships between immunocompromise and viral infection and potential complications resulting from drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Managing these dual threats requires in-depth understanding, targeted treatment plans, and appropriate clinical care. There is a need to define best practices in the diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal infections, as well as the unique challenges in managing SARS-CoV-2 infection in hematological patients. Multidisciplinary collaboration between different professional figures is an essential element to guarantee complete assistance aimed at preventing complications and containing drug resistance, especially with regards to fungal infections.
    Chair: M. Giannella
    11.10 - 11.20
    Clinical features and management: a multidisciplinary approach
    M. Giannella
    11.20 - 11.40
    Clinical debate on COVID-19
    M. Bartoletti, G. Tiseo
    11.40 - 12.00
    Clinical debate on invasive fungal infections (IFI)
    M. Bartoletti, G. Tiseo
    12.00 - 12.10
    Practical considerations
    M. Giannella
    12.15 - 13.15
    Expert Meeting
    COVID-19 risk assessment and prophylaxis in fragile population
    Expert Meeting
    COVID-19 risk assessment and prophylaxis in fragile population
    COVID-19 remains a significant risk for the immunocompromised for being hospitalized or dying from severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, given their poor responsiveness to vaccination or impaired immunity after natural infection. Therefore, passive immunization through long-acting monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offers a needed approach by pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a novel preventive strategy for high-risk populations. This session will present updated data on the anti-SARS-CoV-2 drug sipavibart, a long-acting neutralizing human monoclonal antibody directed against new emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants, which can potentially be used to protect immunosuppressed people from severe disease. Current characterization of risk assessment among immunocompromised persons, new results of sipavibart from randomized clinical and immunobridging trials, and implementation strategy of pre-exposure prophylaxis with monoclonal antibodies in the clinical and public health setting will be the main topics of the session designed to optimize the prevention approach of SARS-CoV-2 in high-risk population.
    Chairs: A. Bandera, P. Bonfanti
    12.15 - 12.35
    Risk assessment of immunocompromised people at risk of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection
    E. Girardi
    12.35 - 12.55
    Update on sipavibart in SARS-CoV-2 pre-exposure prophylaxis
    A. Antinori
    12.55 - 13.15
    Round Table: Implementing strategies and access of persons with hematologic conditions to COVID-19 monoclonal antibody prophylaxis
    Discussants:
    Corrado Girmenia, Roma
    Marzia Mensurati, Roma
    Roberto Parrella, Napoli
    13.15 - 14.15
    Short Communications
    Sexual health and love's labours
    Short Communications
    Sexual health and love's labours
    Chairs: M.L. Cosmaro, A. Latini
    13.15 - 13.18
    Introduction
    M.L. Cosmaro, A. Latini
    13.18 - 13.25
    SC 7
    A hidden challenge: STIs detection prevalence during nPEP follow up. A retrospective analysis
    N.B. Bana1,3, G. Cavazza1,3, E. Di Gennaro1,3, F. Peracchi1,3, C. Baiguera1, A. Raimondi1, F. D'Amico1, A. Nava2, D. Fanti2, M. Puoti1,3, R. Rossotti1
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Clinical Microbiology, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 3School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano Bicocca, Milan, Italy
    13.27 - 13.34
    SC 8
    Increasing Gonorrhea and Chlamydia infections observed in MSM in the early 2024
    C. Stingone1, F. Pimpinelli2, R.J. Riveros Cabral2, E.E. Abril2, L. Gianserra1, G. Prignano2, E. Giuliani1, M. Giuliani1, M.G. Donà1, M. Zaccarelli1, A. Latini1
    1UOSD Dermatologia MST e Malattie Tropicali San Gallicano Dermatological Institute IRCCS, Rome Italy, 2UOSD Microbiologia e Virologia San Gallicano Dermatological Institute IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    13.36 - 13.43
    SC 9
    Sexually transmitted infections in men-who-have-sex-with-men with HIV resistant to tenofovir/emtricitabine and/or cabotegravir
    T. Clemente1,2, M. Bellomo2, A.R. Raccagni1,2, R. Lolatto2, S. Diotallevi2, R. Papaioannu Borjesson1,2, C. Maci1,2, M. Negri1,2, G. Torkjazi3, E. Messina2, S. Bossolasco2, A. Castagna1,2, S. Nozza1,2, V. Spagnuolo2
    1Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 3Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università La Sapienza, Rome, Italy
    13.45 - 13.52
    SC 10
    Applying IANS consensus guidelines for anal cancer screening to men who have sex with men living with HIV: a focus on the HRA referral rate
    M.G. Donà1, M. Benevolo2, F. Rollo2, E. Giuliani1, M. Giuliani1, P. Giorgi Rossi3, C. Stingone1, L. Gianserra1, M. Zaccarelli1, A. Latini1
    1San Gallicano Dermatological Institute IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2IRCCS Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy, 3Epidemiology Unit, Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy
    13.54 - 14.01
    SC 11
    Inadequate compliance with STIs vaccinations among individuals attending a sexually transmitted infection clinic
    G. Cavazza1,2, N.B. Bana1,2, F. Peracchi1,2, E.D. Gennaro1,2, A. Mulè3, L. Denti4, C. Baiguera1, M.C. Moioli1, A. Raimondi1, M. Merli1, R. Rossotti1, M. Puoti1,2
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Health Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 4Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy
    14.03 - 14.10
    SC 12
    Doxycycline post-exposure prophylaxis (DoxyPEP) real-life effectiveness in a cohort of men who have sex with men in Milan, Italy
    A.R. Raccagni1, S. Diotallevi2, R. Lolatto2, E. Bruzzesi1, G. Catalano1, I. Mainardi1, C. Maci1, C. Candela1, C. Muccini1, A. Castagna1,2, S. Nozza1,2
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
    14.12 - 14.15
    Conclusion
    M.L. Cosmaro, A. Latini
    14.20 - 15.20
    Symposium
    Antiviral treatment of COVID-19 for fragile people in the current era
    Symposium
    With an unrestricted educational grant from:Pfizer
    Antiviral treatment of COVID-19 for fragile people in the current era
    After the third year of the COVID-19 pandemic, most of the severe COVID-19 burden falls upon immunocompromised patients who cannot mount an endogenous immune response after both vaccination and/or natural infection. SARS-CoV-2 tends to establish persistent infections in patients who are immunocompromised (IC), where disease recovery and viral clearance are needed to initiate further lines of immunosuppressive treatments for the underlying disorder. Since ritonavir-boosted nirmatrelvir is a recognized highly effective oral antiviral therapy for COVID-19, with a large supporting evidence, it should be strongly considered for patients who are immunocompromised if there are no potential drug-drug interactions or if the potential interactions can be safely managed. This session will review more recent data from scientific research and the evidences in the real-world setting.
    Chairs: A. Antinori, A. Cattelan
    14.20 - 14.25
    Introduction
    A. Antinori, A. Cattelan
    14.25 - 14.45
    From high-risk patients to persistent infection: focus on COVID-19 in the immunocompromised persons
    M. Falcone
    14.45 - 14.50
    Discussion
    14.50 - 15.10
    Antiviral treatment of COVID-19: insights from controlled trials and real-world evidence
    V. Mazzotta
    15.10 - 15.15
    Discussion
    15.15 - 15.20
    Take-home messages
    A. Antinori, A. Cattelan
    15.25 - 17.30
    Symposium and Oral Communications
    COVID-19 and post-Covid conditions in 2024: data from the EuCARE project
    Symposium and Oral Communications
    COVID-19 and post-Covid conditions in 2024: data from the EuCARE project
    SARS-CoV-2 and its continuous evolution still pose scientific questions and challenges, including those related to its immune pathogenesis and to long-COVID. The pandemic also highlighted the need for research on areas like vaccine hesitancy and non pharmacological interventions, e.g. in school. Thanks to a large international collaboration, the EuCARE project is trying to provide advances in a wide variety of SARS-CoV-2 variants related topics.
    Chairs: F. Ceccherini Silberstein, G.C. Marchetti
    15.25 - 15.40
    International collaboration for pandemic preparedness: the EuCARE Project
    F. Incardona
    15.40 - 15.45
    Neutralizing antibody response to the latest SARS-CoV-2 lineages (WP2)
    M. Zazzi
    15.45 - 16.00
    Discussion
    16.00 - 16.10
    OC 20
    Interplay between gut-barrier dysfunction, microbial translocation, microbioma and SARS-CoV-2 RNAemia in acutely ill unvaccinated COVID-19 individuals developing long-covid
    R. Rovito, M. Augello, S. Marozin, V. Bono, A. Santoro, C. Tincati, F. Bai, G. Marchetti, for the EUCARE Study Group
    Clinic of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    16.12 - 16.22
    OC 21
    Trajectories of the Post COVID-19 condition
    F. Bai, A. Santoro, M.F. Greco, M. Sala, R. Castoldi, R. Rovito, G. Marchetti, on behalf of the EuCARE project
    Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Paolo Hospital, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Italy
    16.24 - 16.39
    In-hospital mortality study results (WP3 > Hospitalised)
    A. Cozzi-Lepri
    16.39 - 16.54
    Real-time modeling of SARS-COV-2 variants
    E. Shamsara
    16.54 - 17.09
    Exploring mental health of students in association with SARS-CoV-2 preventive measures (WP4)
    S. Gandini
    17.09 - 17.30
    Discussion
  • Aula 5
    10.05 - 11.05
    Expert Meeting
    Winning cardiometabolic comorbidities in HIV: the best place for doravirine
    Expert Meeting
    With an unrestricted educational grant from:MSD Italia
    Winning cardiometabolic comorbidities in HIV: the best place for doravirine
    This session aims to contribute to understanding the positioning of doravirine in clinical practice and the possibility of including this NNRTI in ART regimens to improve long-term follow-up. In particular, two randomized trials, DRIVE-FORWARD and DRIVE-AHEAD, suggest that doravirine is a viable option for ART, with a particular benefit to the metabolic health of people with HIV due to its excellent metabolic profile, particularly with respect to lipids and body weight. Metabolic health refers to a clinical construct that considers the net advantage for the patient regarding multiple metabolic parameters captured by body composition data (including BMI and visceral and liver fat accumulation), lipid fractions, glucose and insulin resistance, kidney function, and bone turnover. Moreover, metabolic health is not just the absence of metabolic diseases but rather a road map for healthy living. The pathway to improve metabolic health includes lifestyle interventions and a proactive antiretroviral approach to be considered in a patient-centred intervention.
    Chair: C. Mussini
    Discussants: A. Castagna, S. Di Giambenedetto, R. Gagliardini, C. Gervasoni
    11.10 - 12.10
    Oral Communications
    HIV epidemiology and testing promotion
    Oral Communications
    HIV epidemiology and testing promotion
    Chairs: A.M. Geretti, I. Pennini
    11.10 - 11.15
    Introduction
    A.M. Geretti, I. Pennini
    11.15 - 11.25
    OC 1
    Measuring HIV knowledge and attitudes in the healthcare setting: Italian results from an ECDC/EACS survey
    M. Mazzitelli1, M. Trunfio2, A. Mendez Lopez3, E. Martinez4, T. Noori5
    1Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Padua University Hospital, Italy, 2Infectious Disease Unit, Amedeo di Savoia hospital, Department of Medical Science, University of Turin, Turin, Italy, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Public Health and Microbiology, Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain, 4Hospital Clínic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; and CIBER de Enfermedades Infecciosas (CIBERINFEC), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain, 5European Center for Disease Prevention and Control
    11.25 - 11.35
    OC 2
    Modena and Emilia Romagna HIV Surveillance: the application of ECDC HIV Modelling Tool
    M. Menozzi1, A. Cervo1, G. Cuomo1, M. Digaetano1, B. Fontana2, A. Soffritti2, E. Massimiliani3, V. Borghi2, G. Guaraldi2, C. Mussini2
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, University Hospital Policlinico of Modena, Italy, 2Infectious Disease Unit, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 3Public health department, Emilia Romagna Region, Italy
    11.35 - 11.39
    Discussion
    11.39 - 11.49
    OC 3
    HIV testing in Italian community and outreach sites: COBATEST network, 2020-2023
    P. Meli1, I. Mercurio1, L. Cosmaro2, M. Cernuschi3, D. Calzavara4, N. Frattini4, R. Repossi4
    1Bergamo Fast-track City, Bergamo, Italy, 2Fondazione LILA, Milano, Italy, 3ASA Milano, Milan, Italy, 4Milano Checkpoint, Milan, Italy
    11.49 - 11.59
    OC 4
    Estimating the potential health economic value of universal opt-out HIV testing in emergency departments in Italy: A modelling study
    A. d’Arminio Monforte1, G. d’Ettorre2, G. Galardo3, A. van Doornewaard4, E. Lani4, E. Kagenaar4, S. Huntington4, J. Jarret5, M. Ruf5, W. Ricciardi6
    1University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 3Hospital Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy, 4Aquarius Population Health, London, United Kingdom, 5Gilead Sciences, London, United Kingdom, 6Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
    11.59 - 12.03
    Discussion
    12.03 - 12.10
    Conclusion
    A.M. Geretti, I. Pennini
    12.15 - 13.15
    Expert Meeting
    PrEP and more
    Expert Meeting
    PrEP and more
    Numerous efforts have been made to reduce new HIV infections, AIDS cases, and HIV-related deaths in our country. Among various strategies, starting from 2023, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV (PrEP) for key populations has become fully reimbursed by the National Health Service (SSN). This has led to a progressive increase in requests for access to the program and the establishment of dedicated clinics throughout the national territory, even in facilities where clinics for Sexually Transmitted Infections and Preventive Strategies were absent or only serving few users. The "PrEParati" project was therefore conceived to create a training and discussion opportunity among specialists from centers with longer experience to guide, support, and address the challenges and difficulties of these new needs and realities. This session aims to present the highlights and most interesting aspects of what was discussed during the project in order to share this valuable experience with the goal of creating a more uniform and comprehensive implementation within the field of STIs and PrEP.
    Chairs: G.V. Calvino, B.M. Celesia
    12.15 - 12.20
    Introduction
    12.20 - 12.40
    Complex PrEP Clinic: beyond a pill there's an unmet clinical need
    N. Girometti
    12.40 - 12.45
    Discussion
    12.45 - 13.05
    Roadmap for implementing PreP and STIs services in your clinic: the PrEParati Project
    D. Moschese
    13.05 - 13.10
    Discussion
    13.10 - 13.15
    Take-home messages
    13.15 - 14.15
    Short Communications
    PrEParing for the future of prevention
    Short Communications
    PrEParing for the future of prevention
    Chairs: M. Lichtner, P. Meli
    13.15 - 13.18
    Introduction
    M. Lichtner, P. Meli
    13.18 - 13.25
    SC 13
    Impact of PrEP cost on prophylaxis initiation in an Italian centre
    S. Venturelli1, L. Mezzadri2, N. Bana2, L. Comi1, F. Borghi1, A. Ouabou1, D. Ripamonti1
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 2School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy
    13.25 - 13.32
    SC 14
    5 years activity of the Bergamo Fast Track City network: from 2019 looking toward the future
    I. Mercurio1, M. Bonomi1, P. Meli2, D. Meli2, F. Maggiolo3, C. Pellegris4, E. Zanetti4, R. Carissoli5, N. Butta5
    1Croce Rossa Italiana - Comitato di Bergamo, Italy, 2Cooperativa Don Giuseppe Monticelli, Italy, 3Bergamo Fast-Track City, Italy, 4Associazione Comunità Emmaus, Italy, 5Arcigay Bergamo Cives, Italy
    13.32 - 13.36
    Discussion
    13.36 - 13.43
    SC 15
    How the perception of PrEP has changed in the PrEP Point Plus (PPP) user group
    S. Mattioli, S. Cecere, S. Maugeri
    Plus – Persone LGBT+ Sieropositive – aps, Italy
    13.43 - 13.50
    SC 16
    Factors associated with PrEP start after nPEP conclusion. A retrospective analysis
    N.B. Bana1,3, G. Cavazza1,3, E. Di Gennaro1,3, F. Peracchi1,3, C. Baiguera1, A. Raimondi1, F. D'Amico1, A. Nava2, D. Fanti2, M. Puoti1,3, R. Rossotti1
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Clinical Microbiology, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 3School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano Bicocca, Milan, Italy
    13.50 - 13.54
    Discussion
    13.54 - 14.01
    SC 17
    Interest for long-acting PrEP use in the Italian LGBTQIA+ community: a multicentric survey
    M. Stizioli1, A. Tavelli2, F. Leserri1, L. del Negro1, P. Vinti3, M. Barracchia1, M. Falaguasta4, V. Mazzotta5
    1Plus Roma, Rome, Italy, 2Fondazione Icona, Milan, Italy, 3Milano Check Point ETS, Milan, Italy, 4Anlaids Padova, Padua, Italy, 5UOC Immunodeficienze virali, INMI Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    14.01 - 14.08
    SC 18
    What about a change? A survey in PrEP users about interest in injectable Long-Acting agents
    A. Bianchi1,3, A. Tavelli1, R. Rossotti1,2, E. Caruso1, D. Calzavara1, P. Testoni1,3, P. Vinti1, A. De Bona1,4, A. Soria1,5, D. Moschese1,6, D. Tesoro1,4, C. Muccini1,7, A. Cingolani8, M. Cernuschi1,3,7
    1Milano Check Point ETS, Milano, Italy, 2ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milano, Italy, 3ASA ODV, Milano, Italy, 4ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milano, Italy, 5IRCCS San Gerardo dei Tintori, Monza, Italy, 6ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milano, Italy, 7IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Italy, 8IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Gemelli - Università Cattolica del sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy
    14.08 - 14.12
    Discussion
    14.12 - 14.15
    Conclusion
    M. Lichtner, P. Meli
    14.20 - 15.20
    Oral Communications
    Virology and pharmacology across the spectrum of HIV treatment
    Oral Communications
    Virology and pharmacology across the spectrum of HIV treatment
    Chairs: G. Antonelli, A. Calcagno
    14.20 - 14.25
    Introduction
    G. Antonelli, A. Calcagno
    14.25 - 14.35
    OC 16
    Do low-frequency drug-resistant HIV-1 variants have a role on first-line INSTI-containing regimens? A case-control study from the ICONA cohort
    D. Armenia1, G. Marchegiani2, D. Spalletta2, L. Carioti2, A. Tavelli3, M.C. Bellocchi2, V. Spagnuolo4, V. Mazzotta5, E. Quiros-Roldan6, V. Bono7, S. Carrrara5, S. Lo Caputo8, A. Cozzi-Lepri9, A. d'Arminio Monforte3, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein2, S. Rusconi10, M.M. Santoro2, on behalf of the ICONA Foundation Study Group
    1Saint Camillus International University of Health Sciences, Rome, Italy, 2University of Rome “Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 3Icona Foundation, Milan, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 5National Institute of Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 6University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 7ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 8Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Surgical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 9Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK, 10Infectious Diseases Unit, Ospedale Civile di Legnano, ASST Ovest Milanese, and DIBIC, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
    14.35 - 14.45
    OC 17
    Long Acting Cabotegravir and Rilpivirine plasma and intracellular pharmacokinetics in the Clinical Setting
    M. Ferrara1, V. Maccario1, F. Barrera1, L. Ponzetta1, L. Di Girolamo1, D. Arrue Diaz1, M. Tettoni1, L. Trentini1, G. Orofino2, S. Soloperto3, D. Maiese3, A. De Nicolò3, A. D’Avolio3, A. Calcagno1, S. Bonora1
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy, 2Unit of Infectious Diseases, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, ASL Città di Torino, Italy, 3Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenetics, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy
    14.45 - 14.49
    Discussion
    14.49 - 14.59
    OC 18
    Network analysis of proviral DNA mutations in People with 4-class-resistant HIV-1: Data from the PRESTIGIO Registry
    S. Diotallevi1, D. Armenia2, T. Clemente3, F. Saladini4, S. Rusconi5, L. Calza6, A. Cervo7, M. Zazzi4, R. Lolatto1, M.C. Bellocchi8, G. Marchegiani8, L. Carioti8, E. Fronti9, M. Fiscon10, V. Spagnuolo1, A. Castagna3, M.M. Santoro11, L. Farina12 for the PRESTIGIO Registry GROUP
    1Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 2Saint Camillus International University of Health Sciences, Rome, Italy, 3Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 4University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 5Ospedale Civile di Legnano, DIBIC University of Milan, Legnano, Italy, 6Policlinico Sant’Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy, 7Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy, 8Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 9Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Parma, Parma, Italy, 10Azienda ULSS 9 Scaligera, Verona, Italy, 11University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 12Department of Computer, Control and Management Engineering, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
    14.59 - 15.09
    OC 19
    The in vitro genetic barrier to resistance of lenacapavir is not affected by viral subtype or heavy treatment exposure
    C. Paletti1, N. Bartolini1, F. Giammarino1,2, F. Saladini1, I. Vicenti1, L. Fiaschi1, C. Biba1, I. Varasi1, F. Garcia3, A.G. Marcelin4, M. Zazzi1, V. Spagnuolo5, E. Focà6, S. Rusconi7
    1Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 2Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, 3Hospital Universitario Clinico San Cecilio, Clinical Microbiology, Granada, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Ibs. Granada, Spain - Ciber de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Ciberinfec, Madrid, Spain, 4Sorbonne Université, INSERM, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, AP-HP, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Laboratoire de virologie, Paris, France, 5Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 6Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Ovest Milanese, Legnano General Hospital and DIBIC, University of Milan, Milan
    15.09 - 15.13
    Discussion
    15.13 - 15.20
    Conclusion
    G. Antonelli, A. Calcagno
    15.25 - 16.25
    Expert Meeting
    Tailoring of antiretroviral therapy in PWH who go through therapeutic failure. Experts panel discussion on real clinical scenarios
    Expert Meeting
    With an unrestricted educational grant from: Gilead Sciences
    Tailoring of antiretroviral therapy in PWH who go through therapeutic failure. Experts panel discussion on real clinical scenarios
    While modern antiretroviral therapy has been progressing towards increased potency, convenience and durability, controversies in HIV virology and pharmacology remain. This expert meeting focuses on four specific clinical issues: how to manage PWH with drug resistance, low-level viremia, PWH who discontinued long-acting therapies, and PWH with comorbidities and polypharmacy. The goal of this expert meeting is to discuss open controversies in HIV, through an experts panel, to identify timely, appropriate, and individualized treatment approach for these complex clinical scenarios.
    Chairs: A. Cingolani, A. Di Biagio
    15.25 - 15.30
    PWH with resistance associated mutations
    S. Rusconi
    15.30 - 15.40
    Discussion
    Antonella Cingolani, Roma
    Antonio Di Biagio, Genova
    Stefano Rusconi, Legnano MI
    15.40 - 15.45
    PWH with low-level viremia
    L. Sarmati
    15.45 - 15.55
    Discussion
    Antonella Cingolani, Roma
    Antonio Di Biagio, Genova
    Loredana Sarmati, Roma
    15.55 - 16.00
    Discontinuations after switching to long-acting therapy
    S. Nozza
    16.00 - 16.10
    Discussion
    Antonella Cingolani, Roma
    Antonio Di Biagio, Genova
    Silvia Nozza, Milano
    16.10 - 16.15
    PWH with comorbidities and polypharmacy
    S. Bonora
    16.15 - 16.25
    Discussion
    Stefano Bonora, Torino
    Antonella Cingolani, Roma
    Antonio Di Biagio, Genova
    16.30 - 17.30
    Oral Communications
    The complexities of HIV infection
    Oral Communications
    The complexities of HIV infection
    Chairs: A. d'Arminio Monforte, S. Lo Caputo
    16.30 - 16.35
    Introduction
    A. d'Arminio Monforte, S. Lo Caputo
    16.35 - 16.45
    OC 26
    All-cause mortality in people diagnosed with HIV in Italy in 1995-2019: data from the ICONA cohort
    A. Giacomelli1, S. Lanini2,10, S. De Benedittis3, A. De Vito4, M. Mazzitelli5, M. Ceccarelli6, R. Gagliardini2, G. Madeddu4, E. Quiros-Roldan7, D. Checchi8, G. Lapadula9, C. Tascini10, A. Tavelli3, A. Antinori2, E. Girardi11, A. d'Arminio Monforte3 on behalf of Icona Foundation Study Group
    1III Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy, 2Clinical Infectious Diseases Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 3ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 4Unit of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 5Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Padua University Hospital, Padua, Italy, 6Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Messina, Italy, 7Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 8Department of System Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 9Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Gerardo dei Tintori, Univresity of Milano Bicocca, Monza, Italy, 10Dipartimento di Medicina dell'Università di Udine, U.O. Malattie Infettive, Università di Udine e Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata di Udine, Udine, Italy, 11Scientific Direction, National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    16.47 - 16.57
    OC 27
    Burden of advanced HIV disease (AHD) among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-experienced persons with HIV (PWH) in Italy over the past 20 years
    A. Mondi1, A. Cozzi-Lepri2, V. Mazzotta1, S. Nozza3, A. Cingolani4, L. Taramasso5, A. Giacomelli6, F. Bai7, S. Lanini8, V. Bono7, A. Ianniello9, L. Comi10, C. Papalini11, C. Mussini12, E. Girardi13, A. Antinori1, on behalf of Icona Foundation Study Group
    1Clinical and Research Infectious Diseases Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 4Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Safety and Bioethics, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 5Infectious Disease Clinic, IRCCS Policlinico San Martino Hospital, Genoa, Italy, 6III Infectious Disease Unit, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy, 7Department of Health Sciences, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 8Department of Medicine, University of Udine, Udine, Italy, 9Division I of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, ASL Città di Torino, Torino, Italy, 10Infectious Disease Unit, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 11Infectious Diseases Clinic, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 12Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy, 13Scientific Direction, National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    16.59 - 17.09
    OC 28
    Kidney transplantation in people living with HIV: ten-year experience in Modena
    A. Cervo1, M. Albertini2, I. Baldisserotto2, F. Casari2, E. Ghidoni2, F. Romani2, V. Todisco2, G. Mori3, E. Franceschini1,2, G. Donati2,3, C. Mussini1,2, G. Guaraldi1,2
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy, 2University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 3Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplant Unit, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy
    17.11 - 17.21
    OC 29
    HIV advanced naive: the forgotten test
    A. Narducci1, R. Simac1, I.F. Bottalico1, S. Ferrara1, T. Santantonio1, C. Santoro2, A. Saracino2, A. Dargenio2, R. Schiavoni3, L. Mezzogori3, A. Di Biagio3, A. Santoro4, G.C. Marchetti4, C. Tincati4, S. Lo Caputo1
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, A.O.U. Policlinico Foggia, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, A.O.U Consorziale Policlinico Bari, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS San Martino, University of Genova, Genova, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milano, Milano, Italy
    17.23 - 17.30
    Conclusion
    A. d'Arminio Monforte, S. Lo Caputo
  • Aula 6
    11.10 - 12.10
    Oral Communications
    Immune responses to vaccination and emerging infections
    Oral Communications
    Immune responses to vaccination and emerging infections
    Chairs: M. Biasin, A. Cossarizza
    11.10 - 11.15
    Introduction
    M. Biasin, A. Cossarizza
    11.15 - 11.25
    OC 5
    Humoral and cellular immune response after one year from Mpox virus infection
    V. Mazzotta1, G. Matusali2, E. Cimini3, F. Colavita2, R. Casetti3, C. Pinnetti1, A. Mondi1, A. Bettini2, V. Bordoni4, G. Grassi3, G. Prota5, S. Vita6, N. Nicastri6, E. Girardi7, C. Agrati4, F. Maggi2, A. Antinori1
    1Clinical Department, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 2Laboratory of Virology, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 3Laboratory of Cellular Immunology and Pharmacology, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 4Unit of Pathogen Specific Immunity, IRCCS Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy, 5Biological Bank,INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 6Scientific Direction, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy
    11.27 - 11.37
    OC 6
    Anti-MPXV humoral and cellular immune response one year after mpox infection or MVA-BN vaccination
    V. Mazzotta1, E. Cimini1, G. Matusali1, A. Oliva1, F. Colavita1, R. Casetti1, A. Mondi1, S. Meschi1, D. Goletti1, C. Agrati2, E. Girardi1, A. Sette3, A. Grifoni3, F. Maggi1, A. Antinori1
    1National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy, 3La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA, USA
    11.39 - 11.49
    OC 7
    SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and plasma from COVID-19 patients induce extracellular traps by myeloid-derived suppressor cells
    G. Grassi1, S. Gili1, R. Casetti1, Z. Percario2, N. Tumino3, P. Vacca3, S. Notari1, V. Bordoni4, E. Cimini1, F. Cristofanelli1, D. Rubino5, F. Nonini5, E. Affabris2, L. Marchioni5, C. Agrati4, A. Sacchi2
    1Cellular Immunology and Pharmacology Laboratory, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Molecular Virology and Antimicrobial Immunity Laboratory, Department of Science, Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy, 3Immunology Research Area, Innate Lymphoid Cells Unit, IRCCS, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy, 4Oncoematologia e Officina Farmaceutica, IRCCS, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Rome, Italy, 5Clinical Division, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    11.51 - 12.01
    OC 8
    Antiretroviral therapy restores naïve T cell frequencies and functionality in PLWH
    B. Dallan1, M. Campagnaro1, E. Gallerani1, D. Proietto1, R. Cultrera3, M. Libanore4, L. Sighinolfi4, S. Ghisellini5, S. Llewellyn-Lacey6, V. Appay7, D.A. Price6,8, F. Nicoli1, A. Caputo1, D. Segala2
    1Laboratory of Biochemistry, Immunology and Microbiology (BIM), Department of Chemical, Pharmaceutical and Agricultural Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy, 2Department of Translational Medicine, University of Ferrara, Italy; Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Ferrara, Italy,3Department of Translational Medicine, University of Ferrara, Italy; Infectious Diseases-Primary and Community Health Care Dept, Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale di Ferrara, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Ferrara, Italy, 5Laboratory of Clinical Pathology, University Hospital St. Anna, Ferrara, Italy, 6Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff, UK, 7Université de Bordeaux, CNRS UMR 5164, INSERM ERL 1303, ImmunoConcEpT, Bordeaux, France, 8Systems Immunity Research Institute, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff, UK
    12.03 - 12.10
    Conclusion
    M. Biasin, A. Cossarizza
    12.15 - 13.15
    Oral Communications
    Long Acting injectables: the Italian experience
    Oral Communications
    Long Acting injectables: the Italian experience
    Chairs: T. Bini, D. Ripamonti
    12.15 - 12.20
    Introduction
    T. Bini, D. Ripamonti
    12.20 - 12.30
    OC 9
    One-year of long-acting cabotegravir and rilpivirine in people with HIV and a long exposure to antiretroviral therapy: data from the SCohoLART study
    C. Muccini1, N. Gianotti1, S. Diotallevi1, R. Lolatto1, V. Spagnuolo1, D. Canetti1, S. Bagaglio1, V. Gordo Perez1, T. Clemente2, M. Bottanelli2, C. Candela2, S. Nozza1,2, A. Castagna1,2
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 2Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy
    12.32 - 12.42
    OC 10
    Effectiveness of long-acting ART with cabotegravir/rilpivirine in the Icona Cohort
    R. Gagliardini1, S. De Benedittis2, A. Tavelli2, G. Lapadula3, V. Mazzotta1, E. Bruzzesi4, A. Cervo5, G. Carrozzo6, A. Saracino7, S. Rusconi8, G. Marchetti9, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein10, A. Antinori1, A. d'Arminio Monforte2, C. Muccini4 on behalf of Icona Foundation Study Group
    1National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani, IRCCS, Roma, Italy, 2ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 3IRCCS Fondazione San Gerardo dei Tintori, University of Milano Bicocca, Monza, Italy, 4Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 5University Hospital of Modena, Infectious Diseases Clinic, Modena, Italy, 6Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Luigi Sacco Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 7Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Precision and Regenerative Medicine and Ionian Area, Polyclinic of Bari, University Hospital Polyclinic, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, Ospedale Civile di Legnano, ASST Ovest Milanese, and DIBIC, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy, 9Clinic of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 10Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy
    12.44 - 12.54
    OC 11
    Cabotegravir-rilpivirine long-acting injectable regimen: an analysis of the causes of interruption and impact of genotypic drug resistance in a multicentric cohort
    G. Canavesi1, M. Mena1, E. Zaninetta2, L. Gazzola2, T. Bini2, G. Bo3, D. Arrue Diaz3, G. Orofino3, A. De Vito4, G. Madeddu4, C. Grillo5, C. Bartalucci6, F. Centorrino6, N. Squillace7, P. Bonfanti7, S. Rapino8, G. Tiecco8, E. Focà8, M. Menozzi9, F. Caldara Bonaura9, G. Guaraldi9, S. Lo Caputo5, A. Di Biagio6, S. Rusconi1
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Ovest Milanese, Legnano General Hospital and DIBIC, University of Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, San Paolo Hospital and Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, University of Milan, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital and University of Turin, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Sassari and University of Sassari, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria "Ospedali Riuniti" di Foggia and University of Foggia, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, Ospedale Policlinico San Martino and University of Genoa, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS San Gerardo dei Tintori and University of Milan-Bicocca, Monza, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, Spedali Civili di Brescia and University of Brescia, Italy, 9Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria di Modena and University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy
    12.56 - 13.06
    OC 12
    Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) changes in virologically suppressed people living with HIV switching to long acting cabotegravir and rilpivirine
    A. Dargenio1, N. De Gennaro1, M. Poliseno1, F. Balena1, D. Fiordelisi1, V. Spada1, G. Romita1, G. Guido1, F. Di Gennaro1, G. Bruno2, M.A. Purgatorio2, G.B. Buccoliero2, A. Saracino1
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Precision and Regenerative Medicine and Ionian Area (DiMePRe-J), University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Bari, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, San Giuseppe Moscati Hospital, Azienda Sanitaria Locale Taranto, Taranto, Italy
    13.08 - 13.15
    Conclusion
    T. Bini, D. Ripamonti
    13.15 - 14.15
    Themed Discussions
    Antiretroviral therapy: thinking of durability
    Themed Discussions
    Antiretroviral therapy: thinking of durability
    Chairs: G. Madeddu, F. Maggiolo
    13.15 - 13.18
    Introduction
    G. Madeddu, F. Maggiolo
    13.18 - 13.25
    TD 6
    Durability of doravirine-dolutegravir dual combination in a multicenter cohort of elderly people with HIV
    M. Mazzitelli1, C. Cozzolino2, C. Gervasoni3, S. Pagano3, S. Reato3, D. Ripamonti4, L. Comi4, G. Sterrantino5, F. Lagi5, A. Cascio6, M. Trizzino6, V. Iannone7, D. Farinacci7, V. Baldo2, A. Cattelan1
    1Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Padua University Hospital, Padua, Italy, 2Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Sciences and Public Health, Padua University, Italy, 3Gestione Ambulatoriale Politerapie Outpatient Clinic and Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo, Italy, 5Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, ARNAS Civico-Di Cristina-Benefratelli Hospital, Palermo, Italy, 7Institute of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, Italy
    13.25 - 13.32
    TD 7
    Comparing the efficacy and safety of dolutegravir+lamivudine vs bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide fumarate as first-line regimens in a multicenter cohort
    A. Ciccullo1, G. Baldin2, A. Giacomelli3, F. Lagi4, D. Moschese3, S. Rusconi5, G. Sterrantino4, A. Borghetti6, S. Antinori3, C. Mussini7, S. Di Giambenedetto2
    1UOC Malattie Infettive, PO San Salvatore, L'Aquila, Italy, 2Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 4Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Ovest Milanese Ospedaledi Legnano, and DIBIC, University Milan, Legnano, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy, 7Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Modena, Clinica Malattie Infettive e Tropicali, Modena, Italy
    13.32 - 13.39
    TD 8
    Similar Efficacy, Safety and CD4 T cell increase up to Week 96 observed in Fostemsavir (FTR) based regimens from the BRIGHTE study and Dolutegravir (DTG) based regimens from the VIKING-3 study in multidrug resistant (MDR) HIV-1 individuals
    A. Castagna1, N. Gregori2, I. Marcon2, F. Du3, B. Li3, M. Wang3, B. Jones4, M. Prakash4, A. Clark4
    1Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy/ Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 2ViiV Healthcare, Italy, UK, 3GSK, Collegeville, PA, USA, 4ViiV Healthcare, Brentford, UK
    13.39 - 13.46
    TD 9
    Exploring the Use of Darunavir Boosted plus Dolutegravir in Highly Treatment-Experienced HIV Population: A Retrospective Cohort Study
    A. De Vito1,2, G. Moi1, M. Menozzi3, A. Bezenchek4, D. Stanev5, N. Cuomo6, A. Raddi6, F. Stefanelli7, M. Guardiani8, E. Tortellini8, M. Cerchiaro9, G. Brucci9, P. Fusco10, S. Rotundo10, G. Stella11, A. Cozzi-Lepri12, B. Rossetti11, A. Di Biagio9
    1Unit of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 2PhD School in Biomedical Science, Biomedical Science Department, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 3AOU Policlinico di Modena, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 4IPRO-InformaPRO S.r.l., Rome, Italy; EuResist Network GEIE, Rome, Italy, 5Gran Sasso Science Institute GSSI, L’Aquila, Italy, 6UOC Microbiologia e Virologia, Azienda Ospedaliera dei Colli - Presidio "D. Cotugno", Napoli, Italy, 7IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Italy, 8Dipartimento di sanità pubblica e malattie infettive, Policlinico Umberto I, Italy, 9Infectious Diseases Unit, San Martino Policlinico Hospital - IRCCS for Oncology and Neuroscience, Genoa, Italy, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 10AOU Renato Dulbecco, Magna Græcia University of Catanzaro, Italy, 11Infectious Disease Department, USL SUDEST, Toscana, Misericordia Hospital, Grosseto, Italy, 12Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME) Institute for Global Health UCL, London, UK
    13.46 - 13.53
    TD 10
    Real-world data on the effectiveness and safety of bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (B/F/TAF) in people with HIV (PWH): 24-month full dataset results of the Italian BICSTaR cohort
    S. Rusconi1, G.C. Marchetti2, D. Canetti3, V. Esposito4, E. Quiros-Roldan5, B. Candelaresi6, A. Saracino7, V. Malagnino8, A. Antinori9, A. Marongiu10, L. Albini11, R. Caldera11, G. Forcina11, G. Di Perri12
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Ovest Milanese – DIBIC, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, "ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo”, Milan, Italy, 3Clinic of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases and Gender Medicine Unit D. Cotugno Hospital-A.O. dei Colli, Naples, Italy, 5Division of Infectious and Tropical Medicine, ASST Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Clinic, Department of Biological Sciences and Public Health, Marche Polytechnic University, Ancona, Italy, 7Division of Infectious Diseases, Bari University Hospital, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Clinic, University Hospital "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 9HIV/AIDS Department, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 10Gilead Sciences Europe Ltd, Stockley Park, Uxbridge, UK, 11Gilead Sciences Srl, Milan, Italy, 12Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
    13.53 - 14.15
    Discussion
    14.20 - 15.20
    Expert Meeting
    Optimizing the management of patients with skin and soft tissue infections (ABSSSI): focus on fragile population
    Expert Meeting
    With an unrestricted educational grant from: Angelini
    Optimizing the management of patients with skin and soft tissue infections (ABSSSI): focus on fragile population
    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) represent a significant burden on the healthcare system, with increasing incidence and severity, particularly in fragile population, such as the elderly, multi-treated, drug addicts, or people with neuro-psychiatric problems. The involvement of resistant organisms, particularly methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, presents additional challenges in the management of these patients, as well as the need of a multidisciplinary approach. The long-acting lipoglycopeptide dalbavancin with activity against Gram-positive organisms, including MRSA, may offer the opportunity for earlier hospital discharge and be considered in the outpatient setting, including home health care, outpatient infusion clinics, or in the emergency department to avoid delay in treatment and prevent inpatient hospital admissions, which represents a relevant issue particularly in patients at high risk of complications.
    Chairs: A. Cascio, S. Lo Caputo
    14.20 - 14.30
    Introduction: Gram+ infections,  the importance of a specialistic network
    A. Cascio, S. Lo Caputo
    14.30 - 14.50
    Effectiveness of long-acting antibiotic therapy: clinical and real-life evidences
    I. Gentile
    14.50 - 15.10
    The long-acting diagnostic-therapeutic path of patients with Gram+ infections: indications for clinical practice
    S. Carbonara
    15.10 - 15.20
    Take-home messages
    A. Cascio, S. Lo Caputo
    15.25 - 16.25
    Oral Communications
    Modern challenges in sexual health
    Oral Communications
    Modern challenges in sexual health
    Chairs: M. Cascio, P.M. Cinque
    15.25 - 15.30
    Introduction
    M. Cascio, P. Cinque
    15.30 - 15.40
    OC 22
    Female sexual dysfunction: prevalence and risk factors in a cohort of women living with HIV
    M. Salvi1, G. Tiecco1, M. Alberti1, A. Delbarba2, F. Castelli1, E. Quiros-Roldan1
    1Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Unit of Endocrinology and Metabolism, ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy
    15.42 - 15.52
    OC 23
    Knowledge, use and misuse of self-prescribed doxyPEP in a community-based PrEP service
    R. Rossotti1,2, E. Caruso2, D. Calzavara2, P. Vinti2, A. Bianchi2, A. Tavelli2,3, D. Moschese2,4, G. Lapadula2,5, C. Muccini2,6, A. Soria2,5, A. De Bona2,7, M. Cernuschi2,6, A. d’Arminio Monforte2,3
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 2Milano Checkpoint ETS, Milan, Italy, 3ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 4I Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy, 5Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Gerardo dei Tintori, Monza, Italy, 6Unit of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 7Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy
    15.54 - 16.04
    OC 24
    Effectiveness of MenB vaccination against gonorrhoeae among PrEP users and PWH
    L. Labate1,2, C. Marelli1, E. Guarise2, P.M. Postma2, G. Massobrio1,2, L. Taramasso1, I. Schiavetti3, S. Blanchi1, F. Centorrino1, L. Mezzogori1,2, C. Bartalucci1,2, R. Schiavoni1,2, L. Sticchi2, M. Bassetti1,2, A. Di Biagio1,2
    1IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy, 2Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Italy, 3Department of Health Sciences, Section of Biostatistics, University of Genova, Genova, Italy
    16.06 - 16.16
    OC 25
    HPV test in anal specimens: a preliminary evaluation on sampling quality
    A. Rizzo1, D. Moschese2, F. Salari1, A. Giacomelli2, M.V. Cossu2, C. Fusetti2, S. Reato2, G. Carrozzo2, V. Micheli1, A. Gori2, A. Lombardi1, M.R. Gismondo1
    1Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Virology and Bioemergencies, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Infectious Disease, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy
    16.18 - 16.25
    Conclusion
    M. Cascio, P. Cinque
    16.30 - 17.30
    Oral Communications
    Immunological features in people living with HIV
    Oral Communications
    Immunological features in people living with HIV
    Chairs: G. Nunnari, D.L. Trabattoni
    16.30 - 16.35
    Introduction
    G. Nunnari, D.L. Trabattoni
    16.35 - 16.45
    OC 30
    Scant effect of cART on mucosal immune cells during acute HIV infection
    C. Tincati1, V. Bono1, M. Augello1, R. Rovito1, S. Marozin1, A. Santoro1, F. Bai1, A. Muscatello2, A. Bandera2, A. Calcagno3, A. Gori4, S. Rusconi5, S. Nozza6, G. Marchetti1
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences at Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, University of Turin, Turin, Italy, 4Department of Clinical Sciences, Infectious Diseases and Immunopathology, L. Sacco Hospital, Università di Milano, Milan, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Ovest Milanese Ospedale di Legnano, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University Milan, Legnano, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy
    16.47 - 16.57
    OC 31
    Viro-immunological reservoirs characterization in PBMCs and GALT in individuals on dual and triple-ART regimens
    S. Khan1, M. Compagno2, C. Matteucci1, L. Piermatteo3, L. Benedetti2, L. Duca1, R. Scutari1,4, V. Petrone1, A. De Nicolò5, C.A. Chenwi1,6, O. El Khalili1, L. Ferrari2, E. Teti2, A. Bertoli1,7, V. Malagnino2, M. Iannetta2, A. D’Avolio5, G. Di Perri5, V. Svicher3, R. Salpini3, S. Grelli1,7, L. Sarmati2, M. Andreoni2, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1
    1Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 2Department of System Medicine, Clinical Infectious Diseases, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 4Multimodal Laboratory Research Unit, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 5Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenetics, Department of Medical Sciences; University of Turin, Italy, 6Chantal Biya International Reference Center for Research on HIV and AIDS prevention and management (CIRCB), Yaounde, Cameroon, 7Virology Unit, Tor Vergata University Hospital, Rome, Italy
    16.59 - 17.09
    OC 32
    Oxidative stress in virologically suppressed people with HIV: Is dual antiretroviral therapy associated with a more favourable profile?
    F. Lombardi1,2, S. Belmonti1, A. Sanfilippo2, A. Borghetti1, V. Iannone2, P.F. Salvo2, M. Fabbiani3,4, E. Visconti1, S. Di Giambenedetto1,2
    1Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, UOC Malattie Infettive, Roma Italia, 2Dipartimento di Sicurezza e Bioetica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italia, 3Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 4Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy
    17.11 - 17.21
    OC 33
    Characterization of specific T-cell responses to a Three-Doses nonavalent HPV Vaccine Schedule in PLWH on ART
    E. Tortellini1, M. Guardiani1, F. Dominelli1, C. Falvino2, C. Fosso1, M. Barresi1, S. Corazza2, S.G. De Maria2, S. Garattini2, A. Carraro1,2, M.A. Zingaropoli1, F. Mengoni1, C. Giambi4, C. Del Borgo2, R. Marocco2, M. Lichtner2,3
    1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, SM Goretti Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy, 3Department of NESMOS, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 4UOS Profilassi e sorveglianza malattie infettive, SM Goretti Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy
    17.23 - 17.30
    Conclusion
    G. Nunnari, D.L. Trabattoni
    18.30 - 19.30
    Parallel Session
    Screening HIV all'interno del Pronto Soccorso (un progetto congiunto SIMIT-SIMEU)
    Parallel Session
    Screening HIV all'interno del Pronto Soccorso (un progetto congiunto SIMIT-SIMEU)
    Chairs: M. Andreoni, F. De Iaco
    18.30 - 18.45
    Saluti e introduzione
    M. Andreoni, F. De Iaco
    18.45 - 19.10
    Lo screening HIV all'interno del pronto soccorso
    Referenti SIMEU:
    Andrea Fabbri, Napoli
    Beniamino Susi, Roma
    Referenti SIMIT:
    Francesco Maria Fusco, Napoli
    Giulia Carla Marchetti, Milano
    Camilla Tincati, Milano
    19.10 - 19.20
    Discussione
    19.20 - 19.30
    Conclusioni
    M. Andreoni, F. De Iaco
  • Aula 7
    10.05 - 11.05
    Themed Discussions
    People living with HIV: thinking of QoL
    Themed Discussions
    People living with HIV: thinking of QoL
    Chairs: R. Gulminetti, V. Spagnuolo
    10.05 - 10.08
    Introduction
    R. Gulminetti, V. Spagnuolo
    10.08 - 10.15
    TD 1
    Efficacy, safety and metabolic changes at 6-months after switch to long-acting injectable CAB/RPV: results from an observational prospective multicenter study
    C. Bartalucci1,2, L. Taramasso2, E. Ricci3, A. De Vito4, N. Squillace5, S. Ferrara6, E. Pontali7, G. Cenderello8, G.F. Pellicanò9, E. Sarchi10, F. Lagi11, E. Salomoni12, M.A. Carleo13, O. Bargiacchi14, G. Madeddu4, A. Cascio15, B. Menzaghi16, G.V. De Socio17, K. Falasca18, P. Bonfanti5, A. Di Biagio1,2
    1Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 2Department Infectious Disease Clinic, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy, 3Fondazione ASIA, Milan, Italy, 4Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, Italy, 5Infectious Disease Unit, Fondazione IRCCS San Gerardo dei Tintori, Monza - University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy, 6Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 7Department of Infectious Diseases, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Department, Sanremo Hospital, Sanremo, Italy, 9Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Human Pathology of the Adult and the Developmental Age ‘G. Barresi’, University of Messina, Messina, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases Unit, S.Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo Hospital, Alessandria, Italy, 11AOU Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy, 12SOC 1 USLCENTRO FIRENZE, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Florence, Italy, 13Infectious Diseases and Gender Medicine Unit, Cotugno Hospital, AO dei Colli, Naples, Italy, 14Unit of Infectious Diseases, Ospedale Maggiore della Carità, Novara, Italy, 15Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Health Promotion, Mother and Child Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 16Unit of Infectious Diseases, ASST della Valle Olona – Busto Arsizio, Varese, Italy, 17Unit of Infectious Diseases, Santa Maria Hospital, Perugia, Italy, 18Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine and Science of Aging, G. D’Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy
    10.15 - 10.22
    TD 2
    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in people living with HIV treated with long-acting injectable antiretroviral therapy (LAI-ART)
    S. Arsuffi1, C. Mazzi2, S. Calza3, G. Tiecco1, R. Fazio4, G.M. Piccardi4, C. Anzoni1, M. Di Gregorio1, S. Rapino1, I. Polesini1, F. Castelli1, E. Quiros-Roldan1, E. Focà1
    1Clinica di Malattie Infettive e Tropicali, Università degli Studi di Brescia e ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Italy, 2Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e Sperimentali, Università degli Studi di Brescia, Italy, 3Unità di Biostatistica e Biomatematica e Unità di Bioinformatica, Dipartimento di Medicina Molecolare e Traslazionale, Università degli Studi di Brescia, Italy, 4Unità Operativa Farmacia Aziendale, ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Italy
    10.22 - 10.29
    TD 3
    Enhancing adherence and treatment satisfaction in people living with HIV: the impact of cabotegravir plus rilpivirine long-acting in real life
    R. Schiavoni1,2, V. Busin4, D. Malucelli5, L. Taramasso1, L. Mezzogori1,2, C. Bartalucci1,2, L. Labate1, S. Blanchi1, S. Beltramini4, F. Mina4, M. Bassetti1,2, A. Di Biagio1,2
    1IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy, 2Department of Health's Sciences, University of Genoa, Italy, 3Clinica Malattie Infettive, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy, 4Pharmacy Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino - Genoa, Italy, 5Deenova srl – Piacenza, Italy
    10.29 - 10.36
    TD 4
    Clinical experience with Doravirine: real-life study of therapeutic efficacy and influence on metabolic profile of dual versus triple antiretroviral regimens in a tertiary hospital of Milan
    R. Nardo, L. Gazzola, T. Bini, G. Marchetti
    University of Milan, San Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy
    10.36 - 10.43
    TD 5
    Rapid ART initiation and Retention in care of people living with HIV: a six-years observational study in foreigners versus Italian-borne
    L. Gazzola1, R. Nardo1, A. Tavelli2, A. Maschi2, T. Bini1, G.C. Marchetti1
    1University of Milan, Infectious Disease Unit, Milan, Italy, 2University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    10.43 - 11.05
    Discussion
    12.15 - 13.15
    Short Communications
    Novel insights in the management of chronic viral hepatitis
    Short Communications
    Novel insights in the management of chronic viral hepatitis
    Chairs: N. Coppola, V. Svicher
    12.15 - 12.18
    Introduction
    N. Coppola, V. Svicher
    12.18 - 12.25
    SC 1
    Experience from a single centre on HBV seroconversion in people living with HIV and HBV: the relevance of individual clinical history
    M. Simion, A. Soffritti, A. Tili, M. Menozzi, G. Cuomo, M. Digaetano, C. Mussini
    Operative Unit of Infectious Diseases, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
    12.27 - 12.34
    SC 2
    Safety and effectiveness of switching PWH with occult HBV infection to tenofovir-sparing regimens
    V. Malagnino1, A. Giacomelli2, R. Rossotti3, A. Tavelli4, A. Calcagno5, A. Santoro6, G. Calleri5, A. Vergori7, A. Cervo8, V. Svicher9, M. Puoti3, A. d’Arminio Monforte4, L. Sarmati1, A. Cozzi-Lepri10, on behalf of Icona Foundation Study Group
    1Clinical Infectious Diseases, Department of System Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 2III Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST FBF-Sacco, Milan, Italy, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, School of Medicine and Surgery, Milan, Italy, 4ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 5Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin, Italy, 6Clinica di Malattie Infettive, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo-Presidio Ospedaliero San Paolo, Milano, Italy, 7Clinical Infectious Diseases Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 8Unit of Infectious Diseases and Infection Control, ISMETT-IRCCS Istituto Mediterraneo per i Trapianti e Terapie ad Alta Specializzazione, Palermo, Italy; University Hospital of Modena, Infectious Diseases Clinic, Modena, Italy, 9Department of Biology, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 10Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    12.36 - 12.43
    SC 3
    Occult HBV infection and archived resistance to 3TC could predict virological failure during 3TC/DTG maintenance antiretroviral therapy: a retrospective study
    S. Occhineri1, A. Palomba1, T. Matucci1, M.L. Vatteroni2, L. Del Bono1, M. Polidori1, R. Iapoce1, A. Borghetti1, M. Falcone1
    1U.O. Malattie Infettive, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy, 2U.O. Virologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy
    12.45 - 12.52
    SC 4
    Risk of Hepatitis B reactivation in people with HIV (PWH) with isolated anti-core antibody (HBcAb) after switch to 2DR strategies with lamivudine(3TC)/dolutegravir(DTG)
    P.F. Salvo1, V. Iannone1, R.A. Passerotto1, F. Lamanna1, E. Visconti2, F. Lombardi2, C. Torti1,2, S. Di Giambenedetto1,2, G. Baldin2
    1Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche e Chirurgiche, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, 2UOC Malattie Infettive, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    12.54 - 13.01
    SC 5
    HDV persistence is sustained by HBsAg mainly derived from integrated HBV-DNA and is independent from the extent of HBV reservoir
    S. D'Anna1, L. Piermatteo1, G. Brancaccio2, E. Teti3, A. Di Lorenzo3, I. Grossi1, G. Torre1, V. Malagnino3, M. Iannetta3, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein4, C. Pasquazzi5, U. Cillo6, A. Vitale6, E. Gringeri6, M. Magrofuoco6, M. Pacenti7, L. Baiocchi8, S. Francioso8, I. Lenci8, A. Koffas9, A.M. Geretti10, M.L. Abate11, A. Olivero11, G.B. Gaeta12, L. Sarmati3, M. Rizzetto11, U. Gill9, P. Kennedy9, G.P. Caviglia11, V. Svicher1, R. Salpini1
    1Department of Biology, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, Infectious Diseases, University of Padua, Padua, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, University Hospital of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 4Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 5Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy, 6Hepatobiliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, Padua, Italy, 7Microbiology and Virology Unit, Padova University Hospital, Padua, Italy, 8Hepatology Unit, Policlinico Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 9Blizard Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom, 10Department of Systems Medicine, Infectious Disease Clinic, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 11Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy, 12Infectious Disease Unit, University L. Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy
    13.03 - 13.10
    SC 6
    Heterogeneity in the diagnostic sensitivities of HDV RNA quantification assays used in clinical practice in Italy: data from the first national quality control multicenter study
    R. Salpini1, L. Piermatteo1, G.P. Caviglia2, A. Bertoli3,4, M.R. Brunetto5, B. Bruzzone6, A. Callegaro7, C. Caudai8, D. Cavallone5, L. Chessa9, F. Coghe10, N. Coppola11, N. Cuomo12, S. D'Anna1, M. Di Stefano13, F. Facchetti14, C. Farina15, D. Ferraro16, E. Franchin17, D. Francisci18, S. Galli19, A.R. Garbuglia20, W. Gennari21, V. Ghisetti22, P. Lampertico14,23, N. Marascio24, S. Menzo25, V. Micheli26, G. Niro27, A. Olivero2, P. Paba4, C.I. Palermo28, O. Palmieri27, S. Paolucci29, M. Pisaturo11, T. Pollicino30, G. Raffa30, G. Torre1, O. Turriziani31, S. Uzzau32, M. Vatteroni33, M. Zazzi34, A. Craxì16, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein3, Valentina Svicher1 on behalf of the Virology Italian Network Vironet C
    1Department of Biology, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 2Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy, 3Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 4Unit of Virology, Tor Vergata Polyclinic Foundation, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 5Dept of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa and Hepatology Unit and Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Pathology of Hepatitis Viruses, Pisa University Hospital, Italy, 6Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 7Medicina di Laboratorio, ASST Bergamo Est, Bergamo, Italy, 8Microbiology and Virology Unit, Siena University Hospital, Siena, Italy, 9Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche e Sanità Pubblica Università di Cagliari, AOU Cagliari, Italy, 10Microbiologia, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Cagliari, Italy, 11Department of Mental Health and Public Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Caserta, Italy, 12Microbiology and Virology Unit, Domenico Cotugno Hospital, Naples, Italy, 13Clinical and Surgical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital "Riuniti" of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 14Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Foundation IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 15Microbiology and Virology Unit, ASST "Papa Giovanni XXIII", Bergamo, Italy, 16Section of Microbiology and Clinical Microbiology, Department of Health Promotion, Mother and Child Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, PROMISE, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 17Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy, 18Infectious diseases laboratory, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia, Italy, 19Operative Unit of Clinical Microbiology, IRCCS S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy, 20Laboratory of Virology, "Lazzaro Spallanzani" National Institute for Infectious Diseases, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 21Molecular Microbiology and Virology Unit, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathological Anatomy, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Modena, Modena, Italy, 22Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, ASL Città di Torino , Turin, Italy, 23CRC “A. M. and A. Migliavacca” Center for Liver Disease, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 24Unit of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Health Sciences, "Magna Græcia" University, Catanzaro, Italy, 25Department of Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Università Politecnica Delle Marche, Ancona, Italy, 26Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Virology and Bioemergencies, Ospedale Sacco, Milan, Italy, 27Division of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy, Fondazione IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy, 28Policlinico Universitario "Gaspare Rodolico", Catania, Italy, 29Microbiology and Virology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy, 30Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University Hospital "G. Martino" Messina, Messina, Italy, 31Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 32Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 33Virology Unit, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy, 34Department of Medical Biotechnology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy
    13.12 - 13.15
    Conclusion
    N. Coppola, V. Svicher
    13.15 - 14.15
    Short Communications
    HIV associated comorbidities: interplaying matters
    Short Communications
    HIV associated comorbidities: interplaying matters
    Chairs: G. Cenderello, C. Iaria
    13.15 - 13.18
    Introduction
    G. Cenderello, C. Iaria
    13.18 - 13.25
    SC 19
    Lipids, weight gain and Body Mass Index in ARV experienced PLWH treated with Doravirine-based treatments: a comparison between dual or triple regimens vs Bictegravir based triple regimen
    A. Masiello1, V. Iodice1, B. Menzaghi2, L. Taramasso3, R. Bellagamba4, C. Molteni5, G.F. Pellicanò6, N. Squillace7, E. Sarchi8, F. Lagi9, A. Cascio10, M.A. Carleo11, B.M. Celesia12, E. Salomoni13, S. Ferrara14, E. Pontali15, G.V. De Socio16, G. Madeddu17, M. Franzetti18, S. Martini19, K. Falasca20, G. Orofino21, O. Bargiacchi22, D. Fiordelisi23, G. Angioni24, G. Cenderello25, L. Calza26, A. Di Biagio27, P. Bonfanti28, P. Maggi1, for the CISAI Study Group
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, AORN Sant'Anna e San Sebastiano, Caserta, Italy, 2Unit of Infectious Diseases, ASST della Valle Olona – Busto Arsizio (VA), Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Ospedale Policlinico San Martino - IRCCS per l'Oncologia, Genoa, Italy, 4National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani Institute for Hospitalization and Care Scientific, Roma, Lazio, Italy, 5Unit of Infectious Diseases, A. Manzoni Hospital, Lecco, Italy, 6Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Human Pathology of the Adult and the Developmental Age ‘G. Barresi’, University of Messina, Messina, Italy, 7Infectious Disease Unit, Fondazione IRCCS San Gerardo dei Tintori, Monza, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, S.Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo Hospital, Alessandria, Italy, 9AOU Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy, 10Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Health Promotion, Mother and Child Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 11Infectious Diseases and Gender Medicine Unit, Cotugno Hospital, AO dei Colli, Naples, Italy, 12Unit of Infectious Diseases, Garibaldi Hospital, Catania, Italy, 13SOC 1 USLCENTRO Firenze, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Florence, Italy, 14Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 15Department of Infectious Diseases, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy, 16Unit of Infectious Diseases, Santa Maria Hospital, Perugia, Italy, 17Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, Italy, 18UOC Malattie Infettive, ASST Ovest-Milanese, Ospedale Nuovo di Legnano, Legnano, Italy, 19Infectious Disease Unit, University Hospital Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy, 20Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine and Science of Aging, G. D’Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy, 21Division I of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, ASL Città di Torino, Italy, 22Unit of Infectious Diseases, Ospedale Maggiore della Carità, Novara, Italy, 23Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari "Aldo Moro", Bari, Italy, 24Infectious Diseases Unit, SS Trinità Hospital, Cagliari, Italy, 25Infectious Diseases Department, Sanremo Hospital, Sanremo, Italy, 26Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Clinics of Infectious Diseases, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, "Alma Mater Studiorum" University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy, 27Department of Health’s Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 28University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy
    13.27 - 13.34
    SC 20
    Dyslipidemia and real-life prescription of statins among People Living With HIV enrolled in Archi Prevaleat cohort
    B.M. Celesia1, S. Martini2, E.D. Ricci3, L. Galli4, A. Masiello5, C. Muccini4, S. Zacà6, S. Ferrara7, G. Di Filippo8, M.S. Paternò Raddusa1, A. Tartaglia9, R. Basile10, D. Angiletta6, A. Castagna4, P. Maggi2,5
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, ARNAS Garibaldi Hospital, University of Catania, Catania, Italy, 2Department of Mental Health and Public Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Campania, Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy, 3Fondazione ASIA Onlus, Milan, Italy, 4Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 5AORN Sant’Anna e San Sebastiano of Caserta, Caserta, Italy, 6Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari School of Medicine, Bari, Italy, 7Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Studies of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 8Department of Medicine and Surgery, Section of Infectious Diseases, University Federico II of Naples, Napoli, Italy, 9Azienda Ospedaliera di Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 10Section of Infectious Diseases, Grande Ospedale Metropolitano, Bianchi Melacrino Morelli, Reggio Calabria, Italy
    13.36 - 13.43
    SC 21
    The dangerous liaisons: Correlation between lipid profile, subclinical atherosclerosis, hepatic steatosis and hepatic fibrosis in PLWH
    A. Masiello1, S. Ferrara2, A. Tartaglia3, V. Iodice1, F. Laguardia4, A. Boccia4, I. Capriglione4, F. Simeone1, A. Iodice1, P. Maggi1
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, AORN Sant'Anna e San Sebastiano, Caserta, Italy, 2Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 3ASL Foggia, Italy, 4Infectious Disease Unit, University Hospital Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy
    13.45 - 13.52
    SC 22
    A 48-week randomized controlled study of a home-based, app-monitored physical exercise intervention for older people with sarcopenia (Grow Your Muscle - GYM study): Preliminary results on muscle function and body composition at Week-12
    F. Marmondi1,2, L. Galli1, C. Inzaghi3, C. Cerizza2, G. Annicchiarico1, A. Baglivi1, L. Della Torre1, R. Vercesi1,2, A. Castagna1,4, C. Sciorati5, L. Zagato6, G. Banfi3,4, M. Bonato3,7, P. Cinque1,2
    1IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Milan, Italy, 2IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Unit of Neurovirology, Milan, Italy, 3IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milan Italy, 4Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 5IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Unit of Innate Immunity and Tissue Remodeling, Milan, Italy, 6IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Unit of Genomics of Renal Diseases and Hypertension Unit, Milan Italy, 7Università degli Studi di Milano, Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, Milan, Italy
    13.54 - 14.01
    SC 23
    Changes in bone mineral density in antiretroviral therapy-naive people living with HIV-1 aged over 50 years and starting bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide
    L. Calza, M. Giglia, V. Colangeli, F. Baldasso, M. Cantini, I. Grassi, A. Poma, S. Cretella, P. Viale
    Unit of Infectious Diseases1, IRCCS S.Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
    14.03 - 14.10
    SC 24
    Evolution of anal HPV infection and HPV-related squamous intraepithelial lesions in a cohort of PLWH: is there a benefit of HPV vaccination?
    A. Bailoni1,2, M. Sambo1,2, A. D’Antiga1, F. Panza1,2, E. Morelli1,2, M. Zanchi1,2, G. Giuliano1,2, F. Mariani3, S. Lazzi1,4, F. Montagnani1,2, M. Tumbarello1,2, M. Fabbiani1,2
    1Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 2Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Siena University Hospital, Siena, Italy, 3General Surgery and Surgical Oncology Unit, Siena University Hospital, Siena, Italy, 4Pathological Anatomy Unit, Siena University Hospital, Siena, Italy
    14.12 - 14.15
    Conclusion
    G. Cenderello, C. Iaria
    15.25 - 16.25
    Short Communications
    Factors affecting treatment success: from pharmacology to drug resistance
    Short Communications
    Factors affecting treatment success: from pharmacology to drug resistance
    Chairs: A. Callegaro, E. Focà
    15.25 - 15.28
    Introduction
    A. Callegaro, E. Focà
    15.28 - 15.35
    SC 25
    The impact of pharmacogenetics on long-acting cabotegravir and rilpivirine plasma exposures in the clinical setting
    J. Cusato1, M. Ferrara2, M. Antonucci2, T. Razvan Goldan1, S. Soloperto1, G. Di Perri3, A. D’Avolio1, A. Calcagno3, S. Bonora3
    1Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenetics, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin, Italy, 2Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, ASL Città di Torino, Turin, Italy, 3Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin, Italy
    15.35 - 15.42
    SC 26
    The case of dolutegravir plus darunavir antiretroviral regimens: Is it always useful to double the drug doses?
    D. Cattaneo1, A.L. Ridolfo1, A. Giacomelli1, A. Castagna2, S. Antinori1, C. Gervasoni1
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCSS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
    15.42 - 15.46
    Discussion
    15.46 - 15.53
    SC 27
    Comparative analysis of islatravir and tenofovir in vitro activity in NRTI resistant HIV-1 harboring the M184V/I mutation
    N. Bartolini1, C. Paletti1, F. Giammarino1,2, F. Saladini1, I. Vicenti1, L. Fiaschi1, C. Biba1, I. Varasi1, M. Fabbiani1,3, R. Riccardi4, R. Lolatto5, V. Spagnuolo5, A. Castagna5,6, M. Zazzi1
    1Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 2Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, 3Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy, 4Infectious Disease Unit, IRRCS, Policlinico Sant' Orsola, Department Medical Surgical Science, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 6Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy
    15.53 - 16.00
    SC 28
    Evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance in newly diagnosed individuals in Italy according to subtype over the period 2017-2023
    A.C. Ka'e1,2, F. Bassani3,4, O. El Khalili1, A. Bezenchek5, F. Carli6, A. Pupo7, E. Gentilini Cacciola7, L. Pezzati3, L. Duca1, I. Vicenti8, W. Gennari9, F. Lombardi10, A. Shallivari5, F. Saladini8, V. Micheli11, A. Cozzi-Lepri12, A. Lai4, M.M. Santoro1, S. Rusconi3,4
    1Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 2Chantal Biya International Reference Centre for research on HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management (CIRCB), Yaounde, Cameroon, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Ospedale di Legnano, ASST Ovest Milanese, Legnano, Italy, 4Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences (DIBIC), University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 5InformaPRO SRL, EuResist Network GEIE, Rome, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases and Hepatology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria di Parma, Parma, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, La Sapienza University, Rome, Italy, 8Department of Medical Biotechnology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 9Clinical Microbiology Unit, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy, 10Virology Lab, Cattolica University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 11Clinical Microbiology, Virology and Bioemergencies Diagnosis, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 12Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK
    16.00 - 16.07
    SC 29
    Resistance detected in PBMCs predicts virological rebound in HIV-1 suppressed people with HIV-1 switching to modern antiretroviral regimens
    F. Lombardi1, E. Gentilini Cacciola2, F. Carli3, F. Saladini4, F. Bassani5, I. Vicenti4, W. Gennari6, A. Pupo2, L. Duca7, A.C. Ka'e8, C. Muscatiello9, L. Pezzati5, O. El Khalili7, A. Shallvari10, V. Micheli11, A. Bezenchek10, A. Cozzi-Lepri12, S. Rusconi5, M.M. Santoro7
    1UOC Malattie Infettive, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 3UO Malattie Infettive ed Epatologia, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Italy, 4Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 5S.C. Malattie Infettive, ASST Ovest Milanese, Legnano General Hospital and DIBIC, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy, 6Microbiology and Virology Unit, University Hospital, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 7Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 8Chantal Biya International Reference Centre for Research on HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management University of Yaoundé, Yaoundé, Cameroon, 9Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 10InformaPRO SRL, EuResist Network GEIE, Rome, Italy, 11Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Virology and Bioemergencies, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University hospital, Milan, Italy, 12Institute for Global Health, Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation, London, UK
    16.07 - 16.14
    SC 30
    Ultra-deep sequencing of near full-length HIV-1 genomes for detecting natural resistance to lenacapavir and fostemsavir
    E. Lazzari1, G. Rozera1, R. Gagliardini2, V. Mazzotta2, L. Fabeni1, F. Forbici1, G. Berno1, E. Girardi3, A. Antinori2, F. Maggi1, I. Abbate1
    1Laboratory of Virology, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani – IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Clinical Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani – IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 3Scientific Direction, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani – IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    16.14 - 16.22
    Discussion
    16.22 - 16.25
    Conclusion
    A. Callegaro, E. Focà
    16.30 - 17.30
    Short Communications
    COVID-19 Unmasked: role of immunity and early treatment
    Short Communications
    COVID-19 Unmasked: role of immunity and early treatment
    Chairs: A. Bandera, V. Esposito
    16.30 - 16.33
    Introduction
    A. Bandera, V. Esposito
    16.33 - 16.40
    SC 31
    SARS-CoV-2 vaccination influence in development of Long-COVID clinical phenotypes
    M. Antonacci1, P. Pasculli1, M.A. Zingaropoli1, F. Dominelli1, Y.C. Fosso Ngangue1, G.M. Masci2, F. Iafrate2, V. Panebianco2, C. Catalano3, G. Galardo4, P. Palange1, C.M. Mastroianni1, M.R. Ciardi1
    1Department of Public health and infectious diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Department of Human Neurosciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 4Medical Emergency Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy
    16.42 - 16.49
    SC 32
    A machine learning tool to operationalize Intrinsic Capacity in predicting recovery from post-acute sequelae COVID-19
    V. Guidetti1, F. Motta1, J. Milic2, A. Tili3, V. Todisco3, M. Pellegrino3, A. Gallerani3, G. Cuomo3, M. Menozzi3, G. Mancini3, M. Cesari4, F. Mandreoli1, G. Guaraldi2,3
    1Department of Physical, Computer and Mathematical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 2Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy, 4Department of Ageing and Life Course, World Health Organization
    16.51 - 16.58
    SC 33
    MicroRNAs in SARS-CoV-2 infection: a comparative analysis in immunocompromised versus non-immunocompromised patients
    C. Siniscalchi, A. Di Fraia, M. Starace, C. Minichini, S. Imbriani, C. Ricozzi, K. Geloshi, R. Astorri, A. Russo, C. Sagnelli, M. Pisaturo, N. Coppola
    Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Mental Health and Public Medicine, University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Naples, Italy
    17.00 - 17.07
    SC 34
    Impact of Early Antiviral Therapy on Time to SARS-CoV-2 Clearance in High-Risk COVID-19 Patients: A Propensity Score Matching Study
    M. Colaneri1,2, F. Fama1, F. Fassio3, D. Holmes1, G. Scaglione1, A. Lai4, A. Gori1,2,4, A. Riva5, M. Schiavini1, for the Ospedale Luigi Sacco “COVID-19 Hotspot” study group
    1Infectious Diseases and Immunopathology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Università di Milano, L. Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy, 2Centre for Multidisciplinary Research in Health Science (MACH), University of Milano, Milano, Italy, 3Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy, 4Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, Milano, Italy, 5Institute of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine, III Division, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Luigi Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy
    17.09 - 17.16
    SC 35
    Efficacy and safety of Sotrovimab vs oral antivirals in Omicron waves: a retrospective analysis
    C. Cacace1, G. Granata1, A. Russo1, M. Pisaturo1, E. Allegorico2, A. Troise2, M. Vanni2, F.G. Numis2, N. Coppola1
    1Department of Mental and Physical Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy, 2Emergency Unit, PO Santa Maria delle Grazie, Pozzuoli, Italy
    17.18 - 17.25
    SC 36
    SARS-CoV-2-specific neutralizing activity and cytokine profile in newborns of vaccinated and/or infected and vaccinated mothers
    C. Vanetti1, M. Stracuzzi2, M. Garziano1,3, M. Micheloni2, M.L. Murno1, G.V. Zuccotti4, M. Clerici3,5, V. Giacomet2, D. Trabattoni1
    1University of Milan, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Milan, Italy, 2Ospedale L. Sacco, Paediatric Infectious Disease Unit, Milan, Italy, 3University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan, Italy, 4Ospedale dei Bambini V. Buzzi, Department of Paediatrics, Milan, Italy, 5IRCCS Don Carlo Gnocchi Foundation, Milan, Italy
    17.27 - 17.30
    Conclusion
    A. Bandera, V. Esposito
    18.30 - 19.30
    Parallel Session
    Meeting Prestigio
    Parallel Session
    Meeting Prestigio
  • Aula Germania
    15.25 - 17.25
    Special Session
    Approaching Chemsex user: a multidisciplinary practice
    Special Session
    With an unrestricted educational grant from: ViiV Healthcare
    Approaching Chemsex user: a multidisciplinary practice
    Chemsex refers to the use of one or more drugs by MSM before or during sexual activity with one or more partners, organized through geolocation meeting apps and involving specific social interaction dynamics. It's a phenomenon known within the MSM community for many years, but recently, the need for competent support for problematic Chemsex use, which increased during the pandemic, has emerged. However, support is currently scarce. The market is constantly producing new, cheaper substances with unclear effects, posing unpredictable risks. Users may struggle to recognize their problematic use, partly due to stigma and due to its difference from the stereotype of more common and studied substance use, like opioids or cocaine, making it harder to seek help before the situation becomes severe or irreversible. Chemsex can facilitate the spread of STIs, including HIV, due to lowered inhibitions. While many engage in Chemsex without severe consequences, for others, it can develop into a dangerous addiction that's hard to overcome. Some substances can lead to potentially irreversible psychotic crises. There's an urgent need for training among infectious disease, psychiatry, psychology, emergency department professionals, pharmacologists, and addiction service workers, involving users, volunteers and professional operators.
    Chairs: M.G.L. Cernuschi, G. Fracca
    Discussants: M.G.L. Cernuschi, D. Zagato
    15.25 - 15.35
    Welcome and introduction
    M.G.L. Cernuschi, G. Fracca
    15.35 - 15.55
    PrEP and chemsex, description of the phenomenon in the Milan checkpoint cohort
    E. Caruso
    15.55 - 16.15
    NPS (Novel Psychoactive Substances) epidemiological overview and toxicological monitoring
    M. Ciambella
    16.15 - 16.35
    MDPV (methylenedioxypyrovalerone): a survey on awareness and knowledge among users of a Milanese PrEP service
    A.M. Bianchi
    16.35 - 16.55
    Chemsex and possible implications on antiretroviral therapy
    D. Moschese
    16.55 - 17.15
    Round Table Build shared knowledge between users, volunteers, social and health workers
    Moderator:
    Massimo Giuseppe Luigi Cernuschi, Milano

    Discussants:
    Daniele Calzavara, Milano
    Enrico Caruso, Milano
    Massimo Giuseppe Luigi Cernuschi, Milano
    Marta Ciambella, Roma
    Giorgia Fracca, Milano
    Filippo Leserri, Roma
    Davide Moschese, Milano
    17.15 - 17.25
    Closing remarks
    M.G.L. Cernuschi, G. Fracca
    18.30 - 19.30
    Parallel Session
    Sierocoinvolt
    Parallel Session
    Sierocoinvoltə
    Conigli Bianchi e PrEP in Italia presentano Sierocoinvoltə, la rivoluzione sessuale riparte dall'HIV assieme alle persone che hanno scritto il libro. Un viaggio attraverso emozionanti racconti autobiografici che testimoniano quanto l'HIV sia molto di più che un tema meramente scientifico.
    Chair: S. Bellucci
     
    Con la partecipazione di Antonella Cingolani e Antonio di Biagio
 
Plenary-Aula Lazzati
Aula Bausola
Aula 5
Aula 6
Aula 7
Aula Germania
08.00
08.30
09.00
09.30
10.00
10.30
11.00
11.30
12.00
12.30
13.00
13.30
14.00
14.30
15.00
15.30
16.00
16.30
17.00
09.00 - 10.00
Keynote Lectures
New emerging and re-emerging viral infection in Europe and in Italy
E. Petersen
Insights into SARS-CoV-2: an immunological journey throughout imprinting, vaccine responses and risk of subsequent infections
A. Sette
10.05 - 11.05
Symposium
From RCT to clinical practice: evidences in treatment and prevention of LA regimens
11.10 - 12.35
Symposium
Deep into HIV treatment Guidelines
12.40 - 13.40
Symposium
HIV, lights and shadows on new treatment strategies: focus on new drug classes
13.50 - 15.00
Symposium
Striving for an HIV cure: from post-treatment control to a natural cure
15.05 - 16.05
Symposium
Meet the Expert in HIV
16.10 - 16.30
Special Session
ICAR 2024 Awards and Closing remarks
11.10 - 12.50
Meet the Expert and Oral Communications
Critical clinical aspects underlining the control of viral hepatitis and emerging viral infections
12.55 - 13.55
Symposium
New knowledge in chronic viral infections (HBV, HDV, CMV)
14.00 - 15.00
Oral Communications
A tale of two pandemics: molecular insights on SARS-CoV-2 and HIV
15.05 - 16.05
Oral Communications
What is left to say on COVID-19 today?
10.05 - 11.05
Expert Meeting
Vaccination in immunocompromised people: let's protect the vulnerable
11.10 - 12.10
Special Session
Vaccines Pipeline: a glimpse of the future
12.35 - 13.35
Expert Meeting
The unheard voices. Perspectives of difficult patients
13.40 - 14.50
Meet the Expert DREAM and Themed Discussions
Crossing borders and fighting inequalities
15.05 - 16.05
Oral Communications
HIV associated comorbidities: pressing matters
10.05 - 11.05
Oral Communications
Tailored approaches to antiretroviral therapy
11.10 - 12.10
Oral Communications
Awareness in Sexual Health: U=U and prevention
14.00 - 15.00
Oral Communications
PrEP and prevention strategies
15.05 - 16.05
Oral Communications
Highlighting the diversity of people living with HIV
10.30 - 11.30
Short Communications
Hot topics in the epidemiology of relevant chronic and respiratory viral infections
11.35 - 12.35
Themed Discussions
Because the virus matters
13.00 - 13.50
Short Communications
Bridging innate and adaptive immunity in viral infections
14.00 - 15.00
Oral Communications
HIV associated comorbidities: matters of the heart
15.05 - 16.05
Short Communications
Stigma, awareness and education
08.00 - 09.00
Parallel Session
Investigator Meeting of EDOLAS Study
13.20 - 14.20
Parallel Session
Meeting Community - Report campaign U=U: impossibile sbagliare
  • Plenary-Aula Lazzati
    09.00 - 10.00
    Sierocoinvolt
     
    Chairs: A. Cossarizza, A. Saracino
    09.00 - 09.30
    New emerging and re-emerging viral infection in Europe and in Italy
    E. Petersen
    Infectious diseases are dynamic. Outbreaks of known diseases continue to surprise us and new diseases appear, often from zoonotic reservoirs (H5N1 influenza, SARS, Nipah, MERS, SFTS, H7N9 influenza, arboviruses), and some became endemic. The lecture will address new emerging and re-emerging infection in Europe and in Italy.
    09.30 - 10.00
    Insights into SARS-CoV-2: an immunological journey throughout imprinting, vaccine responses and risk of subsequent infections
    A. Sette
    Immunological memory is the basis of protective immunity provided by vaccines and previous SARS-CoV-2 infections. Understanding the diverse mechanisms of developing immunological memory against SARS-CoV-2 could help to define post-infection immunity and address appropriate vaccination strategies. This lecture gives a deep insight into the multiple branches of the adaptive immune system (CD4, CD8 and B cells and antibodies) during SARS-CoV-2 infection.
    10.05 - 11.05
    Symposium
    From RCT to clinical practice: evidences in treatment and prevention of LA regimens
    Symposium
    With an unrestricted educational grant from: ViiV Healthcare
    From RCT to clinical practice: evidences in treatment and prevention of LA regimens
    Antiretroviral therapy is evolving toward longer-duration administrations that can improve adherence and quality of life in PWH. The first fully LA-comprehensive regimen for the treatment of HIV infection in virologically controlled patients, consisting of cabotegravir and rilpivirine, has recently become available; EMA also recently approved cabotegravir for the prevention of HIV infection for people at risk. The objective of this symposium will be to summarize the development of this regimen, the molecule, and the impact of the treatment in the Italian reality and the possible impact of the drug in the prevention setting.
    Chairs: A. Cattelan, C.F. Perno
    10.05 - 10.20
    Introduction: new frontiers in cabotegravir development
    J. Thornhill
    10.20 - 10.30
    Implementation of LA regimens in Italy: data from the ICONA Cohort
    A. Cingolani
    10.30 - 10.45
    Real World Evidence of effectiveness of LA regimens
    C. Muccini, L. Taramasso
    10.45 - 10.55
    Perspectives in PrEP LA regimens
    V. Mazzotta
    10.55 - 11.05
    Discussion
    11.10 - 12.35
    Symposium
    Deep into HIV treatment Guidelines
    Symposium
    Deep into HIV treatment Guidelines
    Advances in antiretroviral therapy have changed the life expectancy of PWH which is now almost comparable to that of HIV-negative individuals. Following a long-life therapy involves facing various challenges, such as choosing the initial therapy, optimizing it if necessary, and developing alternative regimens in case of treatment failure ; this is made possible by the availability of new drugs with different mechanisms of action and different modes of administration. The aim of this symposium is to provide the most up-to-date information on current guidelines for the antiretroviral treatment and give insights into ART strategies and drugs. Discussion and comparison between members/authorities of international HIV treatment guideline and (young) physicians who daily address these issues will lead to this achievement.
    Chairs: A. Castagna, A. Cattelan
    Discussants: R.M. Gulick, E. Martinez
    11.10 - 11.15
    Introduction
    A. Castagna, A. Cattelan
     
    Critical issues and solutions within the DHHS and EACS guidelines. Focus on:
    11.15 - 11.25
    Initial antiretroviral therapy
    A. Giacomelli
    11.25 - 11.35
    Discussion
    R.M. Gulick, E. Martinez
    11.35 - 11.45
    Optimization of antiretroviral therapy
    A. Borghetti
    11.45 - 11.55
    Discussion
    R.M. Gulick, E. Martinez
    11.55 - 12.05
    Virological failure
    V. Spagnuolo
    12.05 - 12.15
    Discussion
    R.M. Gulick, E. Martinez
    12.15 - 12.25
    Antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy
    L. Taramasso
    12.25 - 12.35
    Discussion
    R.M. Gulick, E. Martinez
    12.40 - 13.40
    Symposium
    HIV, lights and shadows on new treatment strategies: focus on new drug classes
    Symposium
    HIV, lights and shadows on new treatment strategies: focus on new drug classes
    Antiretroviral therapy has changed the life expectancy of people with HIV infection (PWH) and drastically improved their quality of life. New drugs for remaining needs are flourishing and progressively reaching the clinical arena. Nevertheless, there are still many pending issues related to their management and efficacy. One of the key topics is the definition of their resistance profile, in vitro and in vivo, in different groups of people with HIV, either naive or drug-experienced; secondly, how to properly assess their pharmacological properties; thirdly, how to leverage new methodologies to determine drug resistance to these drugs in clinical practice. This symposium will shed light on these very important matters for the proper management of people with HIV.
    Chairs: F. Ceccherini Silberstein, S. Rusconi
    12.40 - 12.55
    In vitro and in vivo efficacy
    R. Gagliardini
    12.55 - 13.00
    Discussion
    13.00 - 13.15
    Pharmacology
    A. D'Avolio
    13.15 - 13.20
    Discussion
    13.20 - 13.35
    Resistance
    F. Saladini
    13.35 - 13.40
    Discussion
    13.50 - 15.00
    Symposium
    Striving for an HIV cure: from post-treatment control to a natural cure
    Symposium
    Striving for an HIV cure: from post-treatment control to a natural cure
    The symposium is meant to address different topics concerning the delicate equilibrium between protective and pathogenetic role of the immune system over HIV infection in cohorts exhibiting a peculiar relation with the virus. In particular, a comprehensive review on the correlates of protection characterizing the immune response in cohorts of HIV-exposed uninfected children born from HIV-infected mothers and elite controllers will be provided. The possibility of reprogramming dysfunctional CD8+ T cells to promote properties associated with natural HIV control will we harnessed as well. The critical revision of all these information will be essential to dissect and identify new potential targets/pathways to be exploited in the setting up of innovative therapeutic approaches.
    Chairs: C. Agrati, C. Tincati
    13.50 - 14.05
    Generation of myeloid-derived induced pluripotent stem as a platform to study uninfected donors carrying C-C type 5Δ32 mutation
    D. Mavilio
    14.05 - 14.20
    Exceptional elite controllers: do they truly exist?
    M.S. Clerici
    14.20 - 14.25
    Discussion
    14.25 - 14.40
    NK cells in HIV-1 landscape: Insights from Human and NHP models
    C. Petitdemange
    14.40 - 14.55
    bNAbs for HIV management and cure
    G.C. Marchetti
    14.55 - 15.00
    Discussion
    15.05 - 16.05
    Symposium
    Meet the Expert in HIV
    Symposium
    Meet the Expert in HIV
    The field of HIV medicine continues to be dynamic and innovative, even after more than 40 years since the first report of AIDS. This session is based on expert opinions which explore the latest developments in cutting-edge issues in HIV clinical management.
    Chairs: P. Maggi, A. Moznich
    15.05 - 15.20
    HIV genotipic resistance test: clinical use for today and future challenges
    C.F. Perno
    15.20 - 15.25
    Discussion
    15.25 - 15.40
    Screening for non AIDS-related cancers: what we currently do and what we should do
    E. Vaccher
    15.40 - 15.45
    Discussion
    15.45 - 16.00
    Do not forget the children: pioneering progress in pediatric HIV care…not only drugs
    V. Giacomet
    16.00 - 16.05
    Discussion
    16.10 - 16.30
    Special Session
    ICAR 2024 Awards and Closing remarks
    Special Session
    ICAR 2024 Awards and Closing remarks
    ICAR and SIMIT support and reward the young excellences of Italian research with special prizes announced and awarded during this Session.
    Chairs: M. Andreoni, A. Cingolani, A. Di Biagio, M. Farinella, F. Maggiolo, G.C. Marchetti
     
    ICAR 2024 Scientific Committee Awards: three prizes for the best Clinical, Basic Science and Social Science Abstracts
    F. Maggiolo
     
    SIMIT Special Awards: five prizes for the best Oral Communications in: Clinical HIV, Clinical Hepatitis Virus, Clinical SARS-CoV-2, Virology and Immunopathogenesis, Epidemiology and Social Science
    M. Andreoni
     
    Special Award Liliana del Cupolo: a prize for the best abstract in the field of Covid research in immunocompromised patients
    L. Palla
     
    Closing remarks annuncement of ICAR 2025
    Antonella Cingolani, Roma
    Antonio Di Biagio, Genova
    Massimo Farinella, Roma
    Giulia Carla Marchetti, Milano
  • Aula Bausola
    11.10 - 12.50
    Meet the Expert and Oral Communications
    Critical clinical aspects underlining the control of viral hepatitis and emerging viral infections
    Meet the Expert and Oral Communications
    Critical clinical aspects underlining the control of viral hepatitis and emerging viral infections
    Chairs: G. Carosi, C. Torti
    11.10 - 11.25
    Programs of microelimination of HCV infection: which setting and who to reach?
    M. Andreoni
    An estimated 130-170 million people worldwide are infected with the hepatitis C virus, and there are about 2.8 million new infections each year. In Italy, there are currently about 100 new cases (incidence) of acute hepatitis giving a clinically manifest form each year, while the percentage of the Italian population (prevalence) that has a persistent (chronic) infection is not precisely known. It is believed, however, that this percentage is higher than 3 percent in people born before 1950 and increases progressively with age, but is considerably lower in younger generations. Moreover, the prevalence of the disease is higher in southern Italy and the islands than in central and northern regions. Due to the possibility of using new drugs that are extremely effective against HCV, WHO has launched a project to eradicate HCV infection by 2030. Italy is currently engaged with a screening campaign for the emergence of the undeclared in order to reach the goal indicated by WHO.
    11.25 - 11.30
    Discussion
    11.30 - 11.45
    Recent progress in understanding dengue
    E. Nicastri
    Summer 2023 saw as many as 4 introductions of different Dengue viral genotypes in our country: 3 small outbreaks in the Lazio region and one in the Lombardy region. The identification for the first time of dozens of dengue cases in a major European metropolitan city such as Rome deserves reflections in terms of training of frontline health workers, availability of diagnostic tests including rapid ones, early identification of cases, and integration with territorial and regional epidemiological prevention services, municipal services for pest control, and regional zooprophylactic institutes for other vector control measures. Last but not least, the current epidemic in Central and South America is surprising in size and persistence of the wide circulation of Dengue virus in two consecutive years: several factors could explain the phenomenon, which, however, remains unexpected.
    11.45 - 11.50
    Discussion
    11.50 - 11.55
    Oral Communications introduction
    G. Carosi, C. Torti
    11.55 - 12.05
    OC 38
    Persistent HBV cryptic activity is frequently revealed among anti-HBc positive/HBsAg negative people living with HIV infection during HBV-active ART and can jeopardize the full control of HIV replication
    L. Piermatteo1, R. Salpini1, S. D’Anna1, C. Castelli1, I. Grossi1, T. Mulas2, A. Di Lorenzo2, A. Bertoli3,4, M. Iannetta2, L. Sarmati1, V. Svicher1, V. Malagnino2
    1Department of Biology, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 2Department of System Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Experimental Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 4Virology Unit, Tor Vergata University Hospital, Rome, Italy
    12.07 - 12.17
    OC 39
    Chronic HDV coinfection (CHD) is characterized by a different HBsAg isoforms composition respect to HBV mono-infection with higher middle- and large-HBs levels paralleling the replicative and cytolytic activity of HDV
    A. Magnapera1, L. Piermatteo1, S. D’Anna1, A. Olivero2, L. Duca3, G. Torre1, C. Castelli1, E. Teti4, A. Di Lorenzo4, V. Malagnino4, M. Iannetta4, L. Baiocchi5, S. Francioso5, I. Lenci5, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein3, M. Milella6, A. Saracino6, A. Ciancio2, L. Sarmati4, P. Lampertico7, M. Rizzetto2, G.P. Caviglia2, V. Svicher1, R. Salpini1
    1Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy, 3Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 4Department of Systems Medicine, Infectious Disease Clinic, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 5Hepatology Unit, Policlinico Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 6Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari "Aldo Moro", Bari, Italy, 7Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Foundation IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy
    12.19 - 12.29
    OC 40
    Investigating seroprevalence of IgG against Dengue virus (DENV) in a cohort of people with HIV (PLWH) in a non-endemic country after an autochthonous outbreak: are we ready for next season?
    P.F. Salvo1, F. Lombardi2, A. Sanfilippo, V. Massaroni, G. Baldin2, V. Iannone1, D. Farinacci2, R.J. Steiner1, C. Torti1,2, S. Di Giambenedetto1,2
    1Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche e Chirurgiche, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, 2UOC Malattie Infettive, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    12.31 - 12.41
    OC 41
    Viral Respiratory Infections in Patients with Haematological Diseases over 10 Years: a single-center Experience
    P. Bono1, A. Parisi1, M. Sciumè2, G. Bozzi3, C. Biassoni1, G. Giacomel1, A. Valzano1, S. Allaria1, E. Tagliaferri2, R. Ungaro3, A. Bandera3,4, N.S. Fracchiolla2, A. Callegaro1, C. Alteri1,5
    1Clinical Microbiology and Virology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy, 2Hematology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 4Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milan, Italy, 5Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, University of Milan, Italy
    12.43 - 12.50
    Conclusion
    G. Carosi, C. Torti
    12.55 - 13.55
    Symposium
    New knowledge in chronic viral infections (HBV, HDV, CMV)
    Symposium
    New knowledge in chronic viral infections (HBV, HDV, CMV)
    New important evidences are available on some chronic viral infection. As regard HBV infection the use of new and different therapeutical targets may allow a functional cure of an infection that afflict millions of persons in the world. Recently, the introduction of bulevirtide and the study on other antiviral targets open new scenario in the management of HDV chronic hepatitis. Finally, it seams to be the time to introduce an antimicrobial stewardship strategy also for CMV infection.
    Chairs: N. Coppola, L. Sarmati
    12.55 - 13.10
    From virological suppression to HBV functional cure: is an achievable goal so far by the new drugs?
    M.R. Brunetto
    13.10 - 13.15
    Discussion
    13.15 - 13.30
    HDV from pathogenesis to novel therapies
    M. Puoti
    13.30 - 13.35
    Discussion
    13.35 - 13.50
    Is this the time to introduce CMV stewardship?
    G. Gentile
    13.50 - 13.55
    Discussion
    14.00 - 15.00
    Oral Communications
    A tale of two pandemics: molecular insights on SARS-CoV-2 and HIV
    Oral Communications
    A tale of two pandemics: molecular insights on SARS-CoV-2 and HIV
    Chairs: E. Nicastri, M. Santoro
    14.00 - 14.05
    Introduction
    E. Nicastri, M. Santoro
    14.05 - 14.15
    OC 46
    Genomic epidemiology of the main SARS-CoV-2 variants circulating in Italy during the Omicron era
    A. Bergna1, A. Lai1, F. Sagradi2, S. Menzo3, N. Mancini4, B. Bruzzone5, S. Rusconi6, G. Marchegiani7, N. Clementi8, D. Francisci9, I. Vicenti10, H. Djaya Mbissam1, C. della Ventura1, L. Lanfranchi2, S. Testa2, S. Caucci3, C. Acciarri3, L. Carioti7, A. Occhinero11, F. Novazzi4, A.P. Genoni4, F. Drago Ferrante4, V. De Pace5, M. Ferraris5, M. Ogliastro5, A. Gabrieli1,12, M. De Paschale12, G. Canavesi6, M.C. Bellocchi7, M. Iannetta13, L. Sarmati13, A. Riva1, S. Antinori1, G. Zehender1, and SARS-CoV-2 ITALIAN RESEARCH ENTERPRISE – (SCIRE) collaborative Group
    1Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Unit of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Socio-Sanitaria Territoriale Cremona, Cremona, Italy, 3Department of Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Virology Unit, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy, 4University of Insubria, Department of medicine and Technological Innovation; Ospedale di Circolo e Fondazione Macchi, Laboratory of Medical Microbiology and Virology, Varese, Italy, 5Hygiene Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy, 6Ospedale Civile di Legnano ASST Ovest Milanese - University of Milan, Legnano, Italy, 7Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 8Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology, Università "Vita-Salute" San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 9Department of Medicine and Surgery, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, "Santa Maria della Misericordia" Hospital, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 10Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 11Clinic of Infectious Diseases – AOU delle Marche, Ancona, Italy, 12Unit of Microbiology, Legnano Hospital, ASST Ovest Milanese, Legnano, Italy, 13Clinical Infectious Diseases, Department of System Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy
    14.15 - 14.25
    OC 47
    Genomic characterization of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variants and clinical presentation in immunocompromised and non-immunocompromised adult people
    L. Carioti1, G. Marchegiani1, L. Coppola2, M. Iannetta2, L. Alborghetti2, V. Malagnino2, L. Benedetti2, M.M. Santoro1, M. Andreoni2, L. Sarmati2, C. Alteri3,4, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1, M.C. Bellocchi1
    1University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 2Clinical Infectious Diseases, Department of System Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, University of Milan, Italy, 4Clinical Microbiology and Virology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy
    14.25 - 14.29
    Discussion
    14.29 - 14.39
    OC 48
    Analysis of chromosome integration sites of HIV-1 DNA in PBMC of PWH showing plasma HIV-1 RNA detected only by the LTR target with Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx assay
    G. Sberna1, G. Berno1, G. Rozera1, C. Gruber1, I. Abbate1, R. Gagliardini2, V. Mazzotta2, I. Mastrorosa2, A. Antinori2, F. Maggi1, A. Amendola1
    1Laboratory of Virology, National Institute for Infectious Diseases I.R.C.C.S. L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 2Clinical and Research Infectious Diseases Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases I.R.C.C.S. L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy
    14.39 - 14.49
    OC 49
    Post-translational HIV-1 integrase modification sites might be affected by complex and prolonged treatment history associated with multidrug resistance: a proof of concept study from the PRESTIGIO registry
    D. Armenia1, V. Spagnuolo2, L. Galli2, T. Clemente2,3, R. Lolatto2, D. Minisci4, L. Pagnucco5, R. Pincino6, V. Malagnino7, T. Mulas7, L. Sarmati7, M. Zazzi8, M.M. Santoro9, A. Castagna2,3
    1Saint Camillus International University of Health Sciences, Rome, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 3Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 4University Division of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, Italy, 5Division of Infectious Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy, 6Ospedale di Sanremo-ASL 1 Imperiese, Sanremo, Italy, 7Policlinic of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome Italy, 8Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 9Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy
    14.49 - 14.53
    Discussion
    14.53 - 15.00
    Conclusion
    E. Nicastri, M. Santoro
    15.05 - 16.05
    Oral Communications
    What is left to say on COVID-19 today?
    Oral Communications
    What is left to say on COVID-19 today?
    Chairs: M. Iannetta, C.M. Mastroianni
    15.05 - 15.10
    Introduction
    M. Iannetta, C.M. Mastroianni
    15.10 - 15.20
    OC 58
    Inflammatory milieu and specific T cells response after three months and one year from SARS-CoV-2 infection
    E. Cimini1, C. Cimaglia2, E. Tartaglia3, M. Camici4, S. Notari1, F. Colavita3, G. Matusali3, I. Mastrorosa4, V. Mazzotta4, P. Chinello4, P. Mencarini4, M.L. Giancola4, A. Abdeddaim4, R. Casetti1, G. Grassi1, S. Gili1, F. Cristofanelli1, F. Maggi3, P. Piselli2, E. Girardi5, C. Agrati6, A. Antinori4, A. Vergori4
    1Laboratory of Cellular Immunology and Pharmacology, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 2Clinical Epidemiology Unit, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 3Laboratory of Virology, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 4Clinical Department, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 5Scientific Direction, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 6Unit of Pathogen Specific Immunity, IRCCS Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy
    15.22 - 15.32
    OC 59
    Clinical features and impact on mortality of COVID-19 epidemics in patients with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma: long-term results from a tertiary center in Italy
    E. Zappulo1, L. Ametrano1, S. Barbato2, L. Fusco1, A. Severino2, F. Pane2, I. Gentile1
    1Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery—Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy, 2Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery – Haematology Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy
    15.34 - 15.44
    OC 60
    Time to anti-cancer treatment resumption after SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with active hematological disease undergoing off-label combined antiviral treatments
    E. Matteini1, C. Pinnetti2, F. Frondizi1, E. Rando1, M. Chiuchiarelli1, E. Metafuni3, I. Mastrorosa2, E. Alma3, V. Mazzotta2, R. Santangelo4, S. Marchetti5, M. Sanguinetti4, S. Sica3, C. Torti1,6, A. Antinori2, A. Cingolani1,6
    1Dipartimento di Sicurezza e Bioetica - Sezione di Malattie Infettive, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, 2Clinical and Research Infectious Diseases Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 3Ematologia e Trapianto di cellule staminali emopoietiche, Dipartimento di Scienze di Laboratorio ed Infettivologiche, Italy, 4Department of Laboratory and Hematological Sciences Fondazione Policlinico Gemelli, IRCCS, Department of Basic, Biotechnological Sciences, Intensivological and Perioperative Clinics Catholic University School of Medicine, Italy, 5Department of Laboratory and Hematological Sciences Fondazione Policlinico Gemelli, IRCCS, Italy, 6Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche e Chirurgiche, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    15.46 - 15.56
    OC 61
    SARS-CoV-2 intra-host evolution during acute infection in COVID-19 patients
    C. della Ventura1, A. Bergna1, C.L. Ciubotariu2, H. Chmes1, M. Corbellino2, A. Riva1,2, S. Antinori1,2, G. Zehender1, A. Lai1
    1Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2III Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Luigi Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy
    15.58 - 16.05
    Conclusion
    M. Iannetta, C.M. Mastroianni
  • Aula 5
    10.05 - 11.05
    Expert Meeting
    Vaccination in immunocompromised people: let's protect the vulnerable
    Expert Meeting
    Vaccination in immunocompromised people: let's protect the vulnerable
    The immunocompromised patient is among the ones at greater risk of infections, and therefore vaccinations become fundamental for its management. Among vaccinations recommended for immunocompromised patients the main are against: herpes zoster, pneumococcus, gonorrhea and meningococcus. In this process, the infectious disease specialist has a central role for both the patient and the other specialists involved. One of the strategic objectives of the Global Vaccine Action Plan is for the benefits of immunisation to be equitably extended to all people. This approach encompasses special groups at increased risk of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as those with chronic and immune-compromising medical conditions or at increased risk of disease due to immunosenescence. Despite the remarkable success of global vaccination programmes, vulnerable populations (VPs) - who are particularly susceptible to infectious diseases - are often undervaccinated and are at much higher risk of recurrence, complications than the general population.  There is concern that the immunosuppressive medications used in these patients place them at even greater risk and therefore vaccinations such as herpes zoster, VRS, pneumococcus and meningococcus become fundamental in these population.
    Chairs: M. Andreoni, C.M. Mastroianni
    Discussants: I. Gentile, L. Sarmati, A. Spadea
    11.10 - 12.10
    Special Session
    Vaccines Pipeline: a glimpse of the future
    Special Session
    Vaccines Pipeline: a glimpse of the future
    An open discussion between researchers and R&D representatives of pharmaceutical companies that aims to outline and shape the future of vaccines development in the next decade.
    Chairs: G.C. Marchetti, M. Zazzi
    11.10 - 11.20
    Introduction: Vaccine development, regulatory aspects, and marketing authorisation
    A. Ammassari
    11.20 - 11.30
    Ennio De Gregorio, Head of Research and Development Center Vaccines Italy at GSK
    11.30 - 11.40
    Mel Kohn, Executive Director Medical Affairs at MSD
    11.40 - 11.50
    Alessandro Zollo, Medical Head Vaccines & Immunotherapy Italy at AstraZeneca
    11.50 - 12.10
    Q&A and Discussion
    12.35 - 13.35
    Expert Meeting
    The unheard voices. Perspectives of difficult patients
    Expert Meeting
    With an unrestricted educational grant from: ViiV Healthcare
    The unheard voices. Perspectives of difficult patients
    In recent years, antiretroviral therapies have become extremely effective with a good tolerability profile. Much attention is now paid to the impact of the disease and drugs on the quality of life of people living with HIV, and increasingly PROs are part of evaluations of a treatment regimen. There are particularly complex situations - HTE, frail populations - where the quality aspect may sometimes not be the focus by prioritizing efficacy. In this symposium we want to draw attention to the importance of using PROs in these populations as well, considering the availability of new treatments.
    Chairs: M. Cascio, G. Guaraldi
    12.35 - 12.50
    From collection of PROs to identification of novel outcomes
    A. Cingolani
    12.50 - 13.05
    Evidence and perspective from patients engagement studies
    A. Milinkovic
    13.05 - 13.20
    HTE patients: which outcomes to consider from patient' perspective?
    A. Castagna
    13.20 - 13.35
    Discussion
    13.40 - 14.50
    Meet the Expert DREAM and Themed Discussions
    Crossing borders and fighting inequalities
    Meet the Expert DREAM and Themed Discussions
    Crossing borders and fighting inequalities
    Since its beginning  in 2002, DREAM has been driving significant advancements in the fight against AIDS in Africa: ·In 2002, the introduction of ART with free access in countries where there was nothing ·In 2004, anticipation of the start of therapy compared to existing protocols, triple therapy instead of monotherapy for pregnant women ·Since 2006, routine monitoring of viral load Currently, DREAM is present in 10 African  countries with centers of excellence and national reference laboratories, with 50 active care centers and day hospitals, and 28 molecular biology laboratories. Today, access to therapy is a reality even in the poorest countries, but we are working to reach those who have been left behind: children (especially in West Africa), girls and young women, who are among the groups with the highest incidence; the male population, which does not have easy access to health facilities. Alongside this, there are new challenges: ·non-communicable diseases associated with HIV infection ·the emergence of strains resistant to even the new first-line treatments ·TB co-infection posing problems of sometimes complex diagnosis, ·HPV infection in HIV-positive women, molecular diagnosis of HPV, and vaccination
    Chairs: E. Girardi, F.P. Maraglino
    13.40 - 13.55
    DREAM after 20 years: where we are and who still need to be reached
    G. Guidotti
    13.55 - 14.00
    Discussion
    14.00 - 14.07
    TD 16
    Active close contact investigation of tuberculosis through Computer-Aided Detection and stool Xpert MTB/RIF among people living in Oromia region, Ethiopia: a preliminary results
    G. Guido1, S. Cotugno1, F.V. Segala1, W. Nigussa2, B. Kenate3, A. Tsegaye2, B. Gulo2, F. Cavallin1, A.B. Asmare2, F. Manenti4, E. Facci2, M. Tilahun5, G. Putoto5, F. Di Gennaro1, A. Saracino1
    1Department of Precision and Regenerative Medicine and Ionian Area (DiMePRe-J), University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy, 2Doctors with Africa CUAMM, Wolisso; Etiopia, 3Oromia Regional Health Bureau; Etiopia, 4Doctors with Africa CUAMM, Padova, Italy, 5Armauer Hansen Research Institute (AHRI), Addis Ababa, Etiopia
    14.07 - 14.14
    TD 17
    The impact of COVID-19 on the Virological Suppression in People Living with HIV Followed up at the Hospital Divina Providência in Luanda, Angola
    A. Calcagno1, C. Pizzi2, B. Pocongo3, N. Ronzoni4, F. Alladio1, F. Ngiambudulu5, C. Castilletti4, A. Kalume6, G. Di Perri1, F.G. Gobbi4,7
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Italy, 2Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin and CPO Piemonte, Turin, Italy, 3Instituto Nacional de Luta Contra SIDA – MINSA, Luanda, Angola, 4Department of Infectious - Tropical Diseases and Microbiology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar (VR), Italy, 5Instituto Nacional de Investigação em Saúde (National Institute for Health Research) – INIS, Luanda, Angola, 6Hospital Divina Providência, Luanda, Angola, 7Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy
    14.14 - 14.21
    TD 18
    Trends in HIV-related stigma and gender inequality indicators: findings from a peer-based intervention prevention program in rural northern Uganda
    G. Micheli1, M. Chiuchiarelli2, A. Pierantozzi3, R. Lukwiya4, B. Odong5, F. Opira4, C. Seguiti6, F.S. Aloi7, R. Cauda1, K. De Gaetano Donati2, C. Torti1,2, A. Cingolani1,2 for 'Pe Atye Kena, no longer alone' study group
    1Dipartimento di Sicurezza e Bioetica - Sezione di Malattie Infettive, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, 2Dipartimento di Scienze mediche e Chirurgiche, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS Rome, Italy, 3AIFA-Agenzia Italiana del farmaco, Rome, Italy, 4"Comboni Samaritans of Gulu” Health Center, Gulu, Uganda, 5Medical Teams International, Kitgum, Uganda, 6Fondazione Poliambulanza Istituto Ospedaliero, UOC medicina generale, Brescia, Italy, 7Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Patologia Speciale Medica e Semeiotica Medica, Rome, Italy
    14.21 - 14.28
    TD 19
    High In-hospital Mortality and Significant Prevalence of HIV among Patients Admitted to a Tuberculosis Ward at Divina Providência Hospital in Luanda - Angola, 2023
    A. Lopes Sucuma1, R. Huits2, N. Francisco3, F. Alladio2, A. Kalume5, N. Ronzoni2, E. Salvador2, P. Cattaneo2, F. Gobbi2, A. Calcagno4
    1Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy, 2Department of Infectious Tropical Diseases and Microbiology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Verona, Italy, 3Microbial and Immunological Research Group, National Institute for Health Research, Luanda, Angola, 4Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin, Italy, 5Divina Providencia Hospital, Luanda, Angola
    14.28 - 14.50
    Discussion
    15.05 - 16.05
    Oral Communications
    HIV associated comorbidities: pressing matters
    Oral Communications
    HIV associated comorbidities: pressing matters
    Chairs: S. Carbonara, C. Pinnetti
    15.05 - 15.10
    Introduction
    S. Carbonara, C. Pinnetti
    15.10 - 15.20
    OC 62
    Cancers in people living with HIV: an observational study in the cohort of Modena over 27 years
    F. Prandini1, M. Menozzi2, F. Casari1, D. Lusetti1, B. Fontana1, M. Ricciardetto1, E. Ghidoni1, F. Calandra1, E. Martini1, G. Guaraldi1, C. Mussini1
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, AOU Modena, Modena, Italy
    15.22 - 15.32
    OC 63
    CNS relapse risk in HIV-positive patients affected by DLBCL and HGBL - a retrospective study of the MUSTHAL cohort
    G. Rindone1, M. Rossi2, F. Sabbatini2, P. Columpsi2, D. Dalu3, C. Fasola3, P. Vitiello4, C. Viganò5, E. Suardi6, C. Gambacorti Passerini1,7, P. Bonfanti2,7, A. Bandera8,9, L. Verga1
    1Hematology department IRCCS San Gerardo dei Tintori, Monza, Italy, 2Infectious diseases department IRCCS San Gerardo dei Tintori, Monza, Italy, 3Oncology department ASST Fatebenfratelli Sacco, Milano, Italy, 4Hematology department Ospedale di Busto Arsizio, Busto Arsizio, Italy, 5Oncology department Ospedale Manzoni, Lecco, Italy, 6Infectious diseases department ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milano, Italy, 7University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy, 8Infectious diseases department IRCCS Ca’ Granda Policlinico di Milano, Milano, Italy, 9University of Milano, Milano, Italy
    15.34 - 15.44
    OC 64
    Cognitive Performance in Older People with and without HIV in the GEPPO Cohort
    A. Calcagno1, A. Tommasi2, L. Patetta3, J. Milic4, A. Coin5, C. Mussi6, S. Calza7, B.M. Celesia8, S. Gardin9, D. Azzolino3, E. Lenotti10, M. Ferrara1, B. Fioretti11, G. Madeddu12, F. Barrera1, G. Orofino13, G. Guaraldi4, E. Focà11
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 3Geriatric Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico di Milano, Milano, Italy, 4Department of Mother, Child and Adult Medicine and Surgical Science, Infectious Disease Clinic, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 5Geriatric Unit, University of Padova, Padova, Italy, 6Centre of Gerontological Evaluation and Research, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 7Unit of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 8Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Molecular Biomedicine, University of Catania, ARNAS Garibaldi, Catania, Italy, 9Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Padova, Padova, Italy, 10Geriatric Unit, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, Italy, 11Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, Italy, 12Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Department of Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 13Unit of Infectious Diseases, ’Divisione A’, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, ASLTO2, Torino, Italy
    15.46 - 15.56
    OC 65
    Increasing prevalence of cognitive frailty in people living with HIV
    J. Milic1, S. Renzetti2, S. Calza3, F. Motta4, L. Lazzarini5, M. Cocchi5, V. Todisco6, A. Tili6, M.C. Pellegrino6, M. Menozzi6, G. Cuomo6, G. Mancini6, C. Mussi1, C. Mussini6,7, A. Calcagno8, G. Guaraldi6,7
    1Department of Biomedical and Metabolic Sciences and Neuroscience, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 2Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 3Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 4Department of Physical, Computer and Mathematical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 5School of Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 6Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy, 7Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 8Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, University of Torino, Torino, Italy
    15.58 - 16.05
    Conclusion
    S. Carbonara, C. Pinnetti
  • Aula 6
    10.05 - 11.05
    Oral Communications
    Tailored approaches to antiretroviral therapy
    Oral Communications
    Tailored approaches to antiretroviral therapy
    Chairs: S. Bonora, A. Cascio
    10.05 - 10.10
    Introduction
    S. Bonora, A. Cascio
    10.10 - 10.20
    OC 34
    Clinical outcome of switching to a dual drug regimen (2DR) vs. switching or remaining on a triple (3DR) regimen in the setting of a viral load ≤50 copies/mL
    C. Mussini1, A. Di Biagio2, E. Quiros Roldan3, V. Mazzotta4, A. Costantini5, G. D’Ettorre6, A. Giacometti5, A. Vergori4, A. Tavelli7, M. Andreoni8, A. Castagna9, F. Maggiolo4, A. Antinori4, A. d'Arminio Monforte7, A. Cozzi-Lepri10, on behalf of the Icona Foundation Cohort Study
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena, Modena, Italy, 2Department of Specialist Medicine, Infectious Disease Clinic, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 4Clinical and Research Infectious Diseases Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 5Department of Biomedical Sciences & Public Health, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy, 6Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Umberto I Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 7ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 8Policlinico Tor Vergata, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 9Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 10Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    10.22 - 10.32
    OC 35
    Cumulative risk of discontinuation of modern first-line ART by reason for stopping and type of ART initiated: findings from the ICONA cohort
    M. Poliseno1, M. Giotta2, F. Marascia3,4, G. Micheli5, F. Portunato6, C. Seguiti7, E. Zappulo8, A. Vergori9, E. Quiros-Roldan7, S. Lo Caputo10, A. Saracino1, A. Tavelli11, A. Antinori9, A. d’Arminio Monforte11, A. Cozzi-Lepri12, on behalf of Icona Foundation Study Group
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Precision and Regenerative Medicine and Jonian Area (DiMePreJ), A.O.U.C. Policlinico di Bari, Bari, Italy, 2School of Medical Statistics and Biometry, Department of Interdisciplinary Medicine, University of Bari "Aldo Moro", Bari, Italy, 3Department of Health Promotion, Mother and Child Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties “G. D’Alessandro”, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 4Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Sicilian Regional Reference Center for the Fight against AIDS, AOU Policlinico “P. Giaccone", Palermo, Italy, 5Dipartimento di Sicurezza e Bioetica - Sezione di Malattie Infettive, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 7Fondazione Poliambulanza Istituto Ospedaliero, UOC Medicina Generale, Brescia, Italy, 8Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Naples "Federico II", Naples, Italy, 9Clinical Infectious Diseases Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 10Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Surgical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 11ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 12Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK
    10.34 - 10.44
    OC 36
    CD4 T-cell, CD4/CD8 ratio improvement and a general reduction in inflammatory biomarkers with low level viremia (LLV) up to Week 192 with Fostemsavir (FTR) based regimens in individuals with multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV-1
    V. Spagnuolo1, N. Gregori2, I. Marcon2, F. Du3, B. Li3, M. Wang3, M. Prakash4, A. Clark4
    1Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 2ViiV Healthcare, Italy, UK, 3GSK, Collegeville, PA, USA, 4ViiV Healthcare, Brentford, UK
    10.46 - 10.56
    OC 37
    Well-being in people with HIV after one year of long-acting cabotegravir and rilpivirine
    F. Alberton1,2, S. Diotallevi1, R. Lolatto1, T. Clemente1,2, B. Trentacapilli1,2, C. Candela1,2, S. Nozza1,2, N. Gianotti1, A. Castagna1,2, C. Muccini1
    1IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Infectious Disease, Milan, Italy, 2Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy
    10.58 - 11.05
    Conclusion
    S. Bonora, A. Cascio
    11.10 - 12.10
    Oral Communications
    Awareness in Sexual Health: U=U and prevention
    Oral Communications
    Awareness in Sexual Health: U=U and prevention
    Chairs: S. Cecere, B.M. Celesia
    11.10 - 11.15
    Introduction
    S. Cecere, B.M. Celesia
    11.15 - 11.25
    OC 42
    Information and Misinformation on HIV and the Narration of the Evidence U=U: a mixed method analysis on social media in Italy
    V. Casigliani1, A. Santoro2, A. Chinelli1, A. Agostini2, G. Giupponi3, F. Zollo2, L. Tavoschi1
    1Department of Translational research and new technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy, 2Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Venezia, Italy, 3Lila Onlus - Italian League for the Fight against AIDS, Italy
    11.25 - 11.35
    OC 43
    “U=U impossibile sbagliare” awareness campaign: impact assessment among PLWH
    A. Tavelli1, A. Cingolani2, L. Cosmaro3, S. De Benedittis1, N. Frattini4, G.V. Calvino5, F.M. Fusco6, A. Costantini7, A. Di Biagio8, B.M. Celesia9, M. Guastavigna10, M. Cernuschi11,4, D. Calzavara11, A. Antinori12, F. Von Schloesser13, A. d’Arminio Monforte1, on behalf of Icona Foundation Study Group
    1ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 2Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Catholic University, Rome, Italy, 3LILA ONLUS, Milan, Italy, 4A.S.A. ONLUS, Milan, Italy, 5ANLAIDS ONLUS NAZIONALE, Rome, Italy, 6P.O. ‘D. Cotugno’, Azienda Ospedaliera dei Colli, Naples, Italy, 7Clinical Immunology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria delle Marche - Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy, 8Infectious Disease Clinic, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy, 9Unit of Infectious Diseases, ARNAS Garibaldi Hospital, University of Catania, Catania, Italy, 10S.C. Malattie Infettive e Tropicali I, ASL Città di Torino, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin, Italy, 11Milano Checkpoint ETS, Milan, Italy, 12Clinical Infectious Diseases Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 13NADIR Onlus, Rome, Italy
    11.35 - 11.39
    Discussion
    11.39 - 11.49
    OC 44
    Loss of “U=U status” in Women with HIV: insights into possible reasons for a higher risk compared to Men
    R. Fontana Del Vecchio1, C. Marelli2, A. Tavelli3, C. Costa4, V. Barocci5, S. Gambino6, J. Testa7, M. Merelli8, E. Zappulo9, L. Taramasso2, G. Madeddu10, C. Pinnetti11, A. Cingolani12, A. d'Arminio Monforte3, A. Cozzi-Lepri13 on behalf of Icona Foundation Study Group
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, Umberto I Public Hospital, Siracusa, Italy, 2Department of Specialist Medicine, Infectious Disease Clinic, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy, 3ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Department, SOC 1, USL Centro Firenze, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Florence, Italy, 5Department of Biomedical Sciences & Public Health, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, Bolzano Hospital, Bolzano, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, Busto Arsizio Hospital, ASST Valle Olona, Busto Arsizio (VA), Italy, 8Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria del Friuli Centrale, Udine, 9Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Naples "Federico II", Naples, Italy, 10Unit of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 11Clinical Department of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 12Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Catholic University, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 13Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK
    11.49 - 11.59
    OC 45
    DoxyPEP is already used in two community-based centers in Bologna and Rome. An explorative survey
    M. Stizioli1, M. Barracchia1, S. Mattioli2, L. del Negro1, F. Leserri1
    1Plus Roma, Roma, Italy, 2Plus Nazionale, Bologna, Italy
    11.59 - 12.03
    Discussion
    12.03 - 12.10
    Conclusion
    S. Cecere, B.M. Celesia
    14.00 - 15.00
    Oral Communications
    PrEP and prevention strategies
    Oral Communications
    PrEP and prevention strategies
    Chairs: M.L. Cosmaro, A. Saracino
    14.00 - 14.05
    Introduction
    M.L. Cosmaro, A. Saracino
    14.05 - 14.15
    OC 50
    Implementation of PrEP in Italy: results of PrIDE survey
    S. Nozza1, V. Mazzotta2, T. Masoero3, A. Tavelli3, F. Leserri4, L. Taramasso5, D. Tesoro6, E. Caruso7, A. d'Arminio Monforte3, F.M. Fusco8, M. Menozzi9, E. Milano10, D. Moschese11, R. Rossotti12, F. Barbaro13, S. Cecere14, M. Giglia15, S. Venturelli16, M. Cernuschi7, A. Castagna1, A. Antinori2
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 2Clinical and Research Infectious Diseases Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 3ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 4Plus Roma, Rome, Italy, 5Infectious Disease Clinic, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genova, Italy, 6Unit of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy, 7Milano Checkpoint ETS, Milan, Italy, 8P.O. "D. Cotugno", Azienda Ospedaliera dei Colli, Naples, Italy, 9Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy, 10Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Precision and Regenerative Medicine and Ionian Area, Polyclinic of Bari, University Hospital Polyclinic, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 11I Division of Infectious Diseases, Luigi Sacco Hospital, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy, 12Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, School of Medicine and Surgery, Milan, Italy, 13Department of Medicine, Infectious Diseases Unit, University Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy, 14Bologna checkpoint, Bologna, Italy, 15Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS Policlinico di Sant'Orsola, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy, 16Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 17Infectious Diseases
    14.15 - 14.25
    OC 51
    HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) efficacy, adherence and persistence in an Italian multicentric cohort: ItaPrEP study
    V. Mazzotta1, D. Calzavara2, A. Tavelli3, S. Lanini4, R. Esvan1, A. De Bona5, S. Mattioli6, E. Caruso3, De Zottis1, D. Tesoro5, L. Badia6, S. Nozza7, A. Cingolani8, A. Bianchi3, R. Bellagamba1, M. Pedone6, N. Frattini3, A. Oliva1, R. Repossi3, R. Rossotti9, C. Mastroianni10, C. Torti8, G. Marchetti5, A. Castagna7, A. d’Arminio Monforte2, M. Cernuschi3, A. Antinori1
    1HIV/AIDS Unit, INMI L. Spallanzani IRCCS, Roma, Italy, 2Milano Checkpoint, Milano, Italy, 3Fondazione Icona, Milano, Italy, 4Clinica Malattie Infettive, Università di Udine, Italy, 5ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milano, Italy, 6PLUS aps (BLQ Checkpoint), Bologna, Italy, 7HSR San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy, 8Fondazione Policlinico A. Gemelli, Catholic University, Roma, Italy, 9ASST Niguarda Hospital, Milano, Italy, 10Sapienza University, Roma, Italy
    14.25 - 14.29
    Discussion
    14.29 - 14.39
    OC 52
    Overcoming HPV vaccination barriers in target populations: the VACCINAMILANO experience
    P. Raimondo1, D. Dalu2, E. Caruso3, C. Fusetti1, C. Fasola2, D. Calzavara3, F. Barone1, F. Manoni2, M.V. Cossu1, L. Ruggieri2, A. Giacomelli1, R. Repossi3, M.S. Cona2, N. Frattini3, N. La Verde2, A. Gori1, M. Cernuschi3, D. Moschese1
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, Luigi Sacco University Hospital – Milan, Italy, 2Oncology Unit, Luigi Sacco University Hospital – Milan, Italy, 3Milano Checkpoint ETS – Milan, Italy
    14.39 - 14.49
    OC 53
    HIV screening strategies in the Emergency department to reveal hidden infections
    F. Romano1, A. Santoro2, A. Lazzaro1, L. Santinelli1, F. Biamonte2, L. Colombo3, G. Galardo4, C. Tincati2, C.M. Mastroianni1, G.C. Marchetti2, G. d’Ettorre1
    1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Policlinico Umberto I of Rome, Rome, Italy, 2Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Paolo Hospital, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Emergency Department, San Paolo Hospital, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy, 4Medical Emergency Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
    14.49 - 14.53
    Discussion
    14.53 - 15.00
    Conclusion
    M.L. Cosmaro, A. Saracino
    15.05 - 16.05
    Oral Communications
    Highlighting the diversity of people living with HIV
    Oral Communications
    Highlighting the diversity of people living with HIV
    Chairs: N. Gianotti, G. Mazzola
    15.05 - 15.10
    Introduction
    N. Gianotti, G. Mazzola
    15.10 - 15.20
    OC 66
    Socio-demographic, clinical and therapeutic features of persons with HIV (PWH) currently in care in Italy: data from the ICONA cohort
    A. d'Arminio Monforte1, A. Rodano'1, I. Fanti1, C.F. Perno2, D. Segala3, A. Santoro4, M.B. Pasticci5, L. Calza6, A. Carraro7, A. Cingolani8, M. Puoti9, A. Castagna10, S. Lo Caputo11, A. Tavelli1, A. Antinori12 on behalf of Icona Foundation Study Group
    1ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 2IRCCS Bambino Gesù Pediatric Hospital, Rome, Italy, 3Pathology Department, University of Brescia, ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 4Clinica di Malattie Infettive, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo-Presidio Ospedaliero San Paolo, Milano, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Unit, Santa Maria Terni Hospital, Terni, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS Policlinico di Sant'Orsola, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy, 7Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 8Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Catholic University, Rome, Italy, 9Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 11Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Surgical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 12National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani, IRCCS, Roma, Italy
    15.22 - 15.32
    OC 67
    Low prevalence of optimal health-related quality of life in real-world data among people with HIV
    J. Milic1, E. Gnoatto Perondi1, F. Motta2, V. Menozzi3, M. Simion3, F. Romani3, M. Menozzi3, G. Cuomo3, G. Mancini3, C. Mussini1,3, G. Guaraldi1,3
    1Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 2Department of Physical, Computer and Mathematical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy
    15.34 - 15.44
    OC 68
    African women living with HIV in Modena: far from fulfilling the gap
    F. Casari1, A. Cervo2, M. Pellegrino1, C. Puzzolante2, M. Menozzi2, G. Guaraldi1,2, C. Mussini1,2
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, AOU Modena, Modena, Italy
    15.46 - 15.56
    OC 69
    Pregnant women living with HIV: the experience of IRCCS San Gerardo dei Tintori
    A. Ranzani1, G. Lapadula1,2, F. D’Aloia4, S. Ornaghi2,3, A. Locatelli2,3, P. Bonfanti1,2, F. Sabbatini1
    1S.C. Malattie Infettive, IRCSS San Gerardo dei Tintori, Monza, Italy, 2Università degli Studi Milano-Bicocca, Italy, 3S.C. Ostetricia, IRCSS San Gerardo dei Tintori, Monza, Italy, 4Scuola di specializzazione in Malattie Infettive e Tropicali, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Italy
    15.58 - 16.05
    Conclusion
    N. Gianotti, G. Mazzola
  • Aula 7
    10.30 - 11.30
    Short Communications
    Hot topics in the epidemiology of relevant chronic and respiratory viral infections
    Short Communications
    Hot topics in the epidemiology of relevant chronic and respiratory viral infections
    Chairs: G.V. Calvino, G. Lapadula
    10.30 - 10.33
    Introduction
    G.V. Calvino, G. Lapadula
    10.33 - 10.40
    SC 37
    HIV infection among migrants present in Italy from 2012 to 2022: incidence and characteristics
    V. Regine, L. Pugliese, B. Suligoi
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy
    10.42 - 10.49
    SC 38
    High rates of anal polyomaviruses and HPV co-infection among people living with HIV
    M. Fracella1, S. Passerini2, G. Bugani2, F. Frasca1,2, A. D’Auria1, E. Coratti1, L. Santinelli2, D. Benvenuto3, E.N. Cavallari2, C.M. Mastroianni2, G. Antonelli1,4, A. Pierangeli1, G. d’Ettorre2, V. Pietropaolo2, C. Scagnolari1
    1Laboratory of Virology, Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Institute, Department of Safety and Bioethics, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, 4Microbiology and Virology Unit, Sapienza University Hospital “Policlinico Umberto I”, Rome, Italy
    10.51 - 10.58
    SC 39
    Trends of toxoplasma antibody prevalence in naive people living with HIV in Italy. Data from the ICONA cohort
    G. Bozzi1, M. Giotta2, A. Ranzani3, F. Conti4, A. Raimondi5, D. Tesoro6, A. Giacomelli7, A. Tavelli8, M.C. Moioli5, N. Bobbio9, G. Toti10, A. Gori11, A. Di Biagio12, A. Bandera1, A. d'Arminio Monforte8, on behalf of the ICONA cohort
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 2School of Medical Statistics and Biometry, Department of Interdisciplinary Medicine, University of Bari "Aldo Moro", Bari, Italy, 3IRCCS "San Gerardo dei Tintori", Monza, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Unit, Alessandro Manzoni Hospital, Lecco, Italy, 5Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 6Unit of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy, 7III Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST FBF-Sacco, Milan, Italy, 8ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 9Department of Infectious Diseases, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases Department SOC 1, USL Centro Firenze, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Florence, Italy, 11Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences L. Sacco, University of Milan, ASST FBF-Sacco, Milan, Italy, 12Infectious Diseases Clinic, IRCCS Policlinico San Martino Hospital, Genoa, Italy
    11.00 - 11.07
    SC 40
    Epidemiological evolution of Hepatitis C Virus infection and treatment outcomes in Tuscany (Italy): a comprehensive analysis spanning the direct-acting antiviral era and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic
    M.P. Tramonti Fantozzi1, L. Ceccarelli2, E. De Vita1, D. Petri1, P. Colombatto3, C. Stasi4, B. Rossetti5, M. Brunetto6, C. Bianco7, D. Redi7, D. Tacconi7, A. Agostini1, F. Panza8, M. Fabbiani8, S. Modica9, S. Moneta9, S. Iacopini9, S. Luchi9, S. Chigiotti5, G. Ottaviano5, C. Nencioni5, A.L. Zignego10, E. Mariabelli11, P. Pierotti11, P. Blanc11, R. Berni12, C. Silvestri12, L. Tavoschi1
    1Department of Translational Research and of New Surgical and Medical Technologies, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Science, Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy, 3Hepatology Unit, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy, 4Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy, 5Division of Infectious Diseases, AUSL Toscana Sud Est, Grosseto Hospital, Grosseto, Italy, 6Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa and Hepatology Unit, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy, 7Division of Infectious Diseases, Arezzo Hospital, Arezzo, Italy, 8Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Siena University Hospital, Siena, Italy, 9Division of Infectious Diseases and Hepatology San Luca Hospital, AUSL Toscana Nord Ovest, Lucca, Italy, 10Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy, 11Division of Infectious Diseases 1-2, AUSL Toscana Centro, Florence, Italy, 12Epidemiology Unit, Tuscany Regional Health Agency, Florence, Italy
    11.09 - 11.16
    SC 41
    Cases of untyped Influenza A virus in northern Italy
    I. Giberti1, F. Stefanelli2, N. Randazzo2, B. Galano2, G. Garzillo1, G. Guarona1, V. Chessa2, R. Qosja2, S. Varesano1, B. Giusto2, V. Ricucci2
    1Department of Health Sciences (DiSSal), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 2Hygiene Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy
    11.18 - 11.25
    SC 42
    Respiratory syncytial virus viral load and co-infection in a very large cohort of pediatric patients, which role in the disease severity?
    R. Scutari1,2, V.C. Di Maio2, L. Colagrossi2, L. Forquè1,2, G. Linardos2, L. Coltella2, S. Ranno2, E. Galeno2, M. Pisani3, A.C. Vittucci3, A. Villani3, C. Russo2, C.F. Perno1,2
    1Multimodal Research Area, Microbiology and Diagnostics of Immunology Unit, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Microbiology and Diagnostic Immunology Unit, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Emergency, Acceptance and General Pediatrics, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy
    11.27 - 11.30
    Conclusion
    G.V. Calvino, G. Lapadula
    11.35 - 12.35
    Themed Discussions
    Because the virus matters
    Themed Discussions
    Because the virus matters
    Chairs: B. Bruzzone, A. Mondi
    11.35 - 11.38
    Introduction
    B. Bruzzone, A. Mondi
    11.38 - 11.45
    TD 11
    Viral Blips among People Living with HIV following recommended vaccines
    B. Trentacapilli1, A.R. Raccagni1, S. Diotallevi2, R. Lolatto2, D. Canetti2, E. Messina2, V. Spagnuolo1,2, M. Ranzenigo2, M. Bottanelli1, C. Maci1, A. Castagna1,2, S. Nozza1,2
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
    11.45 - 11.52
    TD 12
    Clinical presentation of newly diagnosed PWH in the last four-years period post COVID-19 pandemic, in a single center in Rome: a retrospective observational study
    V. Iannone1, A. Carbone1, G. Lenzi1, G. Baldin2, P.F. Salvo1, R. Passerotto2, A. Cingolani1,2, S. Di Giambenedetto1,2, C. Torti1,2, F. Lombardi2
    1Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Infectious Diseases Unit, Rome, Italy, 2UOC Infectious Diseases, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy
    11.52 - 11.59
    TD 13
    Clinical and Immunovirological Features of Potential Post Treatment HIV Controllers
    E. Focà1, S. Rapino1, M. Ferrara2, G. Tiecco1, F. Bai3, B. Fioretti1, T. Roatta2, M. Sala3, S. Bonora2, G. Marchetti3, A. Calcagno2
    1Division of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 2Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    11.59 - 12.06
    TD 14
    Two-drugs regimens did not influence HIV-1 DNA in people living with HIV
    A. Nava1, R. Rossotti2, G. Cavazza3, E. Nicolini4, A. Raimondi2, A. Corbetta1, E. Franchetti1, L. Chianura2, C. Moioli2, M. Puoti2, C. Vismara1, D. Fanti1
    1SC. Clinical Microbiology- ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 2SC. Infectious Diseases – ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda,Milan, Italy, 3School of Medicine and Surgery, University Bicocca, Milan, Italy, 4Resident Student Microbiology and Virology; University of Milan, Italy
    12.06 - 12.13
    TD 15
    Virological performance and resistance-associated mutations in people living with HIV switching to bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide in the Italian ARCA cohort: the BIC-BARRIER Study
    L. Pezzati1, F. Conti2, A. Cozzi Lepri3, W. Gennari4, C. Mussini5, E. Pontali6, A. Volpe7, I. Vicenti8, A. Saracino7, B. Rossetti9, B. Bruzzone10, A. Shallvari11, L. Albini12, D. Corsini11, M. Zazzi8, S. Rusconi13, ARCA Study Group
    1ASST Ovest Milanese, Infectious Diseases Unit, Legnano, Italy, 2ASST Lecco, Infectious Diseases Unit, Lecco, Italy, 3Institute for Global Health - UCL, Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), London, United Kingdom, 4Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, SDD Virologia - Microbiologia molecolare, Modena, Italy, 5Università degli Studi di Modena-Reggio Emilia, Infectious Diseases Unit, Modena, Italy, 6Ente Ospedaliero Ospedali Galliera, Infectious Diseases Unit, Genova, Italy, 7Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro", Infectious Diseases Unit, Bari, Italy, 8Università degli Studi di Siena, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche, Siena, Italy, 9USL Sud-Est Toscana, Ospedale della Misericordia, Infectious Diseases Unit, Grosseto, Italy, 10Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria San Martino, Hygiene Unit, Genova, Italy, 11InformaPRO S.r.l., EuResist Network GEIE, Roma, Italy, 12Gilead Sciences Srl, Milano, Italy, 13DIBIC, University of Milan, Legnano, Italy
    12.13 - 12.35
    Discussion
    13.00 - 13.50
    Short Communications
    Bridging innate and adaptive immunity in viral infections
    Short Communications
    Bridging innate and adaptive immunity in viral infections
    Chairs: S. Parisi, I. Vicenti
    13.00 - 13.03
    Introduction
    S. Parisi, I. Vicenti
    13.03 - 13.10
    SC 43
    Modulation of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) T cells response in PLWH after switching to long-acting (LA) cabotegravir plus rilpivirine
    M. Guardiani1, E. Tortellini1, A. Carraro1, M.A. Zingaropoli1, F. Dominelli1, C. Falvino1, S. Garattini1, P. Zuccalà2, R. Marocco2, G. Mancarella2, F. Mengoni1, O. Turriziani3, V. Vullo1, C.M. Mastroianni1, C. Del Borgo2, M. Lichtner2,4
    1Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Rome, Italy, 2Sapienza University of Rome, Infectious Diseases Unit, SM Goretti Hospital, Latina, Italy, 3Sapienza University of Rome, Laboratory of Virology, Department of Molecular Medicine, Rome, Italy, 4Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health, and Sense Organs, NESMOS, Rome, Italy
    13.12 - 13.19
    SC 44
    T cells profile in persons living with HIV (PLWH) with Progressive Multifocal Leucoencefalopathy (PML)
    E. Cimini1, M. Chiuchiarelli2, E. Tartaglia3, S. Notari1, R. Casetti1, A. Mondi4, F. Cecilia4, F. Frondizi2, E. Matteini2, C. Torti2,5, G. Matusali3, F. Maggi3, A. Antinori4, A. Cingolani2,5, C. Pinnetti4
    1Laboratory of Cellular Immunology and Pharmacology, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 2Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche e Chirurgiche, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 3Laboratory of Virology, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 4Clinical and Research Infectious Diseases Department, INMI-IRCCS Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 5Dipartimento di Sicurezza e Bioetica - Sezione di Malattie Infettive, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
    13.21 - 13.28
    SC 45
    Comparing T-Spot and In-House IGRA for Assessing SARS-CoV-2-Specific Cell-Mediated Immunity
    L. Benedetti1, L. Ferrari2, A. Ruggiero3, N. Braccialarghe1, L. Piermatteo5, L. Sarmati1,2, A.M. Geretti1,2,4, M. Iannetta1
    1Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, Fondazione PTV, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Neuroscience, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy, 4School of Immunity and Microbial Sciences, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, 5Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
    13.30 - 13.37
    SC 46
    Vδ2 T cells effector response in PLWH and PLWoH up to three months from mpox infection
    E. Cimini1, E. Tartaglia2, A. Coppola1, S. Notari1, V. Mazzotta3, G. Matusali2, R. Casetti1, G. Grassi1, A. Mondi3, A. Oliva3, S. Gili1, F. Cristofanelli1, M. Tempestilli1, G. Prota4, E. Girardi5, F. Maggi2, A. Antinori3
    1Laboratory of Cellular Immunology and Pharmacology, INMI-IRCCS L, Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 2Laboratory of Virology, INMI-IRCCS L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 3Clinical Department, INMI-IRCCS L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 4Biological bank, INMI-IRCCS L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 5Scientific Direction, INMI-IRCCS L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy
    13.39 - 13.46
    SC 47
    Are neutralizing autoantibodies to type I interferon novel disease determinants in people living with HIV?
    G. Bugani1, F. Frasca1,2, A. D’Auria2, M. Fracella2, L. Maddaloni1, L. Santinelli1, G. Ceccarelli1, C.M. Mastroianni1, A. Pierangeli2, O. Turriziani2, G. Antonelli2, G. d’Ettorre1, C. Scagnolari2
    1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, 2Virology Laboratory, Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
    13.48 - 13.50
    Conclusion
    S. Parisi, I. Vicenti
    14.00 - 15.00
    Oral Communications
    HIV associated comorbidities: matters of the heart
    Oral Communications
    HIV associated comorbidities: matters of the heart
    Chairs: P. Bonfanti, P. Maggi
    14.00 - 14.05
    Introduction
    P. Bonfanti, P. Maggi
    14.05 - 14.15
    OC 54
    Incidence of metabolic syndrome in people with HIV in Italy who started ART since 2008: data from the ICONA cohort
    E. Bruzzesi1, A. Tavelli2, R. Salpini3, A. Carraro4, M. Camici5, C. Papalini6, G.E. Recchia7, C.R. Santoro8, M.V. Cossu9, A. Guida10, A. Mondi5, G. Marchetti11, G. Guaraldi12, A. d'Arminio Monforte2, S. Nozza1,13, on behalf of ICONA Foundation Study Group
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 2ICONA Foundation, Milan, Italy, 3Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Unit, SM Goretti Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy, 5Clinical and Research Infectious Diseases Department, national Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Clinic, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 7Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Clinic, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 9Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases and Gender Medicine Unit, Cotugno Hospital, AO dei Colli, Naples, Italy, 11Clinic of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 12Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena, Modena, Italy, 13Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
    14.17 - 14.27
    OC 55
    Current and temporal exposure to integrase strand transfer inhibitors are not associated with hypertension or arterial stiffness in people with HIV
    G. Alfano1, J. Milic2, M. Mantovani4, F. Calandra Buonaura4, F. Motta3, M. Menozzi4, G. Cuomo4, G. Mancini4, C. Mussini2,4, G. Donati1, G. Guaraldi2,4
    1Nephrology Dialysis and Transplant Unit, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy, 2Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 3Department of Physical, Computer and Mathematical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy
    14.29 - 14.39
    OC 56
    Metabolic and weight changes in people with HIV after switching to long-acting therapy with cabotegravir and rilpivirine: results from the SCohoLART study
    M. Bottanelli1, N. Gianotti2, S. Diotallevi2, R. Lolatto2, V. Spagnuolo2, D. Canetti2, S. Bagaglio2, V. Gordo Perez2, T. Clemente1, C. Candela1, S. Nozza1,2, A. Castagna1,2, C. Muccini2
    1Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
    14.41 - 14.51
    OC 57
    Carotid intima media thickness (IMT) and statins prescriptions in the real life setting of the Archi Prevaleat cohort
    B.M. Celesia1, S. Martini2, E.D. Ricci3, L. Galli4, A. Masiello5, C. Muccini4, S. Zacà6, S. Ferrara7, G. Di Filippo8, M.S. Paternò Raddusa1, A. Tartaglia9, R. Basile10, D. Angiletta6, A. Castagna4, P. Maggi2,5
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, ARNAS Garibaldi Hospital, University of Catania, Catania, Italy, 2Department of Mental Health and Public Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Campania, Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy, 3Fondazione ASIA Onlus, Milan, Italy, 4Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 5AORN Sant’Anna e San Sebastiano of Caserta, Caserta, Italy, 6Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari School of Medicine, Bari, Italy, 7Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Studies of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 8Department of Medicine and Surgery, Section of Infectious Diseases, University Federico II of Naples, Napoli, Italy, 9Azienda Ospedaliera di Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 10Section of Infectious Diseases, Grande Ospedale Metropolitano, Bianchi Melacrino Morelli, Reggio Calabria, Italy
    14.53 - 15.00
    Conclusion
    P. Bonfanti, P. Maggi
    15.05 - 16.05
    Short Communications
    Stigma, awareness and education
    Short Communications
    Stigma, awareness and education
    Chairs: F. Mazzotta, L.A.R. Rancilio
    15.05 - 15.08
    Introduction
    F. Mazzotta, L.A.R. Rancilio
    15.08 - 15.15
    SC 48
    Stigma on Screen: A Systematic Review of Cinema's HIV Narrative between 2016 and 2023
    A. Colpani1, G. Moi1, L. Cutzu2, G. Madeddu1, A. De Vito1,3
    1Unit of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 2Università degli Studi di Sassari, DUMAS, Sassari, Italia, 3PhD School in Biomedical Science, Biomedical Science Department, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy
    15.15 - 15.22
    SC 49
    Minority stress and stigmatizing attitudes towards HIV: a cross-sectional study among MSM on PrEP, people living with HIV and people not living with HIV in Italy
    F.M. Nimbi1,2, I. Pennini2, L. Palla3
    1Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology and Health Studies, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, 2Arcigay Associazione Italiana LGBT, Bologna, Italy, 3Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
    15.22 - 15.26
    Discussion
    15.26 - 15.33
    SC 50
    Experience of a community-based chemsex service: analysis of requests for help during the MDPV outbreak
    A. Bianchi1, P.L. Vinti1, A. Antonino1, P. Testoni1, F. Rossi1, M. Manfredini1, G. Fracca1, D. Zagato1, M. Cernuschi1,2
    1ASA Onlus ODV, Milano, Italy, 2San Raffaele Hospital, Milano, Italy
    15.33 - 15.40
    SC 51
    Chemsex knowledge and use among PrEP-users and PWH: a survey on the Milanese scene
    C. Fusetti1, E. Caruso2, F. Barone1, D. Calzavara2, F. Caruso1, R. Repossi2, R. Fattore1, A. Giacomelli1, M.V. Cossu1, C. Atzori1, A. Gori1,3, M. Cernuschi2, D. Moschese1,2
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 2Milano Checkpoint ETS, Milan, Italy, 3Centre for Multidisciplinary Research in Health Science (MACH), University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    15.40 - 15.44
    Discussion
    15.44 - 15.51
    SC 52
    Comprehensive sexual health education in Italian secondary schools: preliminary results of the EduForIST national project
    A. Chinelli1, D. Martinelli2, G. Paparatto1, L. Bonaldo1, M. Di Nino1, A. Musco2, M. Ubbiali3, M. Farinella4, L. Mangieri5, M. Rohani6, I. Pennini7, S. Bellini8, R. Galipò9, P. Meli10, N. Catucci11, M. Di Tullio11, V. De Falco12, P. Fallace13, F. Rizzi14, B. Suligoi15, M.C. Salfa15, P. Nardone15, D. Pierannunzio15, S. Donati15, S. Ciardullo15, L. Tavoschi1
    1University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy, 2University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 3University of Verona, Verona, Italy, 4Circolo di cultura omosessuale Mario Mieli, Roma, Italy, 5Coordinamento Nazionale Comunità di Accoglienza (CNCA), Roma, Italy, 6Arcigay, Bologna, Italy, 7Arcigay, Padova, Italy, 8Lega Italiana per la Lotta all’AIDS (LILA), Firenze, Italy, 9Associazione Nazionale per la Lotta all’AIDS (ANLAIDS), Roma, Italy, 10Coordinamento Italiano Case Alloggio HIV/AIDS (CICA), Bergamo, Italy, 11Lega Italiana per la Lotta all’AIDS (CamaLILA), Bari, Italy, 12Associazione Nazionale per la Lotta all’AIDS (ANLAIDS) Campania, Napoli, Italy, 13ASL Napoli2 Nord, Napoli, Italy, 14Arcigay Friuli, Udine, Italy, 15Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, Italy
    15.51 - 15.58
    SC 53
    From information to test: the experience with high school students
    C. Pellegris1, D. Meli1, P. Meli1, I. Mercurio1, E. Zanetti1, F. Maggiolo2, A. Cambareri3, S. Malvestiti4, S. Zuppardo5, F. Tognoli6, I. Fontana7
    1Cooperativa Don Giuseppe Monticelli – Bergamo, Italy, 2Bergamo Fast-Track City, Italy, 3IISS Ettore Majorana - Seriate, Italy, 4ISISS Valle Seriana - Gazzaniga, Italy, 5IIS Caterina Caniana – Bergamo, Italy, 6Liceo Don Milani – Romano di Lombardia, Italy, 7Ufficio Scolastico Territoriale di Bergamo, Italy
    15.58 - 16.02
    Discussion
    16.02 - 16.05
    Conclusion
    F. Mazzotta, L.A.R. Rancilio
  • Aula Germania
    08.00 - 09.00
    Parallel Session
    Investigator Meeting of EDOLAS Study
    Parallel Session
    Investigator Meeting of EDOLAS Study
    08.00 - 08.15
    Introduzione
    A. Antinori, F. Maggiolo
    08.15 - 08.25
    Protocollo EDOLAS
    R. Gagliardini
    08.25 - 08.40
    Status centri e status arruolamenti
    R. Gagliardini
    08.40 - 08.55
    Discussione
    08.55 - 09.00
    Conclusioni
    A. Antinori
    13.20 - 14.20
    Parallel Session
    Meeting Community - Report campaign U=U: impossibile sbagliare
    Parallel Session
    Meeting Community - Report campaign U=U: impossibile sbagliare
    Chair: F. Schloesser
    13.20 - 13.50
    Report campagna Impossibile Sbagliare
    D. Calzavara, N. Frattini
    13.50 - 14.20
    Impact of the Italian campaign U=U: impossibile sbagliare on people with HIV housed in CICA's network accommodation
    L.A.R. Rancilio
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